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TITLE
Meal mill, Garrabost, Lewis
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_GARRABOSTMILL
PLACENAME
Garrabost
DISTRICT
Lewis
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Stornoway
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1988
KEYWORDS
mills
threshing
audio

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In this audio extract, Bill Sinclair discovers the many advantages of running a meal mill. The recording was made at the Garrabost Meal Mill, on the Eye Peninsula, east of Stornoway, Lewis.

This engine here - I use it for light and for bruising.

Interviewer: Uh-huh. [Engine starts up and runs] It also gives you your electricity?

Oh yes, oh yes. It lights up the place for me.

Interviewer: Now is this a part of the original equipment, John?

No, no, no. I installed this engine myself here.

Interviewer: Is it quite an old engine itself?

Yes. This engine - Was during the war I got this engine and it was used for lighting and I just have it for its lighting ability and - Now, then.

Interviewer: I'll get away from the sound of it a little bit. And then you've got your -

Yes.

Interviewer: Is that for the bruising machine here?

This is the bruising - This is the bruising machine here which I drive off that - off that engine. Maybe I should put the belt on it and it -

Interviewer: Oh, it might help. You've got your wide belt that you're putting around the wheel and -

Yes, yes.

Interviewer: - going to connect this to your, to your engine. [Engine stops and starts up again]

Now this machine we use for bruising corn and -

Interviewer: Now you've got the hopper at the top there?

The hopper at the top here. See the bruised corn?

Interviewer: Ah, yes.

Which is used for feeding animals. [Engine dies down]

Interviewer: That's wonderful seeing it operate.

Now then. That's the corn after it's been bruised an we use it for feeding cows an sheep an that.

Interviewer: Now, is this a machine that you'll see much around now in use?

Oh yes, there are many farms have these machines still. They use - they bruise their corn an their barley for feeding their cattle with. Bruised barley is very good feeding an so is - so - bruised oats is very good feeding too.

Interviewer: How old will that machine be?

That machine is, let me see, about ninety years old.

Interviewer: It's great, isn't it?

Yes, yes.

Interviewer: I think the - Gives you just a feeling not, not quite of the past, I wouldn't like just to say the past but the - the way of life not too long ago -

Oh not too long ago. That's right.

Interviewer: - which perhaps is away for good.

Maybe, and maybe not. If hard times were coming, and if we had - if we experienced famine as people in other countries are doing - one never knows what might happen again

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Meal mill, Garrabost, Lewis

ROSS: Stornoway

1980s; 1990s

mills; threshing; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Miscellaneous

In this audio extract, Bill Sinclair discovers the many advantages of running a meal mill. The recording was made at the Garrabost Meal Mill, on the Eye Peninsula, east of Stornoway, Lewis. <br /> <br /> This engine here - I use it for light and for bruising. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Uh-huh. [Engine starts up and runs] It also gives you your electricity?<br /> <br /> Oh yes, oh yes. It lights up the place for me.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now is this a part of the original equipment, John?<br /> <br /> No, no, no. I installed this engine myself here.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Is it quite an old engine itself?<br /> <br /> Yes. This engine - Was during the war I got this engine and it was used for lighting and I just have it for its lighting ability and - Now, then.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I'll get away from the sound of it a little bit. And then you've got your - <br /> <br /> Yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Is that for the bruising machine here?<br /> <br /> This is the bruising - This is the bruising machine here which I drive off that - off that engine. Maybe I should put the belt on it and it - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Oh, it might help. You've got your wide belt that you're putting around the wheel and - <br /> <br /> Yes, yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: - going to connect this to your, to your engine. [Engine stops and starts up again] <br /> <br /> Now this machine we use for bruising corn and - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now you've got the hopper at the top there?<br /> <br /> The hopper at the top here. See the bruised corn?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Ah, yes.<br /> <br /> Which is used for feeding animals. [Engine dies down]<br /> <br /> Interviewer: That's wonderful seeing it operate.<br /> <br /> Now then. That's the corn after it's been bruised an we use it for feeding cows an sheep an that.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now, is this a machine that you'll see much around now in use?<br /> <br /> Oh yes, there are many farms have these machines still. They use - they bruise their corn an their barley for feeding their cattle with. Bruised barley is very good feeding an so is - so - bruised oats is very good feeding too. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: How old will that machine be?<br /> <br /> That machine is, let me see, about ninety years old.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: It's great, isn't it?<br /> <br /> Yes, yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I think the - Gives you just a feeling not, not quite of the past, I wouldn't like just to say the past but the - the way of life not too long ago - <br /> <br /> Oh not too long ago. That's right. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: - which perhaps is away for good. <br /> <br /> Maybe, and maybe not. If hard times were coming, and if we had - if we experienced famine as people in other countries are doing - one never knows what might happen again