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TITLE
A service train crossing the Findhorn Viaduct, 2002
EXTERNAL ID
NRM_NBNW_HML_DS050194
PLACENAME
Findhorn
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
MORAYSHIRE
DATE OF IMAGE
December 2002
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Lynn Patrick
SOURCE
National Railway Museum, York
ASSET ID
19904
KEYWORDS
railway
railways
trains
viaducts
A service train crossing the Findhorn Viaduct, 2002

A ScotRail service train, photographed in December 2002, crossing the Findhorn Viaduct that carries the Highland main line 49 meters (160 feet) above the valley of the River Findhorn. Built between 1894 and 1897, this impressive curved viaduct runs for 445 yards (407 metres) between masonry spans at a height of 45 meters (146 feet) from the ground. It is topped by a smaller lattice steel structure and is supported by eight tapering stone piers, which reduce in height as they meet the rising side of the valley. The two piers which flank the river stand on plinths, whereas the others plunge directly into the earth. It was designed and built by Sir John Fowler and Murdoch Paterson to carry the Aviemore-Carr Bridge-Inverness Direct Line built by the Highland Railway Company. It connects via an embankment with the Tomatin Viaduct. These two viaducts and the embankment between them were designed and built in one undertaking.

Background
Over one hundred years ago, two of the most picturesque railways in the world, the Kyle line and the Far North line, were built. Linking them to the rest of the UK rail network is the Highland main line. From 1997 to 2003 the National Railway Museum photographed these three lines, and from the images three exhibitions were created - 'Connection to the Kyle', 'By Firth and Flow' and 'The Highland Link'. The exhibitions were hosted on the Scottish Archive Network (SCAN) under the digital exhibition 'North by Northwest' which officially launched the National Archive of Scotland site on 5 June 2001 in Inverness. The collaboration with SCAN lasted until 2009 when 'North by Northwest' was transferred to the Am Baile website.

'North by Northwest' documents living history and records a snapshot of time in the lives of the people and the lines during the closing years of the twentieth century and the emergence of the twenty-first century. The exhibitions celebrated the impact of the Highland railways on the people, landscape and economy of the Scottish Highlands.

We acknowledge support from the following sponsors who funded the photographic survey of the Highland main line, the Kyle and the Far North lines by the National Railway Museum photographers between 1997 and 2003:

Railtrack, Railtrack-Scotland, ScotRail, EWS, Porterbrook, First Engineering, The Highland Rail Network Development Partnership, The Highland Council, Ross & Cromarty Enterprise, Caithness & Sutherland Enterprise, Safeways, Friends of the National Railway Museum, Perth & Kinross Council, and the Highland Railway Society.

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A service train crossing the Findhorn Viaduct, 2002

MORAYSHIRE

2000s

railway; railways; trains; viaducts

National Railway Museum, York

North by Northwest - The Highland Line

A ScotRail service train, photographed in December 2002, crossing the Findhorn Viaduct that carries the Highland main line 49 meters (160 feet) above the valley of the River Findhorn. Built between 1894 and 1897, this impressive curved viaduct runs for 445 yards (407 metres) between masonry spans at a height of 45 meters (146 feet) from the ground. It is topped by a smaller lattice steel structure and is supported by eight tapering stone piers, which reduce in height as they meet the rising side of the valley. The two piers which flank the river stand on plinths, whereas the others plunge directly into the earth. It was designed and built by Sir John Fowler and Murdoch Paterson to carry the Aviemore-Carr Bridge-Inverness Direct Line built by the Highland Railway Company. It connects via an embankment with the Tomatin Viaduct. These two viaducts and the embankment between them were designed and built in one undertaking. <br /> <br /> Background<br /> Over one hundred years ago, two of the most picturesque railways in the world, the Kyle line and the Far North line, were built. Linking them to the rest of the UK rail network is the Highland main line. From 1997 to 2003 the National Railway Museum photographed these three lines, and from the images three exhibitions were created - 'Connection to the Kyle', 'By Firth and Flow' and 'The Highland Link'. The exhibitions were hosted on the Scottish Archive Network (SCAN) under the digital exhibition 'North by Northwest' which officially launched the National Archive of Scotland site on 5 June 2001 in Inverness. The collaboration with SCAN lasted until 2009 when 'North by Northwest' was transferred to the Am Baile website.<br /> <br /> 'North by Northwest' documents living history and records a snapshot of time in the lives of the people and the lines during the closing years of the twentieth century and the emergence of the twenty-first century. The exhibitions celebrated the impact of the Highland railways on the people, landscape and economy of the Scottish Highlands.<br /> <br /> We acknowledge support from the following sponsors who funded the photographic survey of the Highland main line, the Kyle and the Far North lines by the National Railway Museum photographers between 1997 and 2003:<br /> <br /> Railtrack, Railtrack-Scotland, ScotRail, EWS, Porterbrook, First Engineering, The Highland Rail Network Development Partnership, The Highland Council, Ross & Cromarty Enterprise, Caithness & Sutherland Enterprise, Safeways, Friends of the National Railway Museum, Perth & Kinross Council, and the Highland Railway Society.