Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Wildlife on the West Coast of Lewis
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_GRAINKILN_03
PLACENAME
Bragar
DISTRICT
Lewis
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Barvas
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1993
KEYWORDS
crofters
birds
mammals
plants
audio

Get Adobe Flash player

Bragar is a crofting township on the west coast of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, between the settlements of Arnol to the north and Shawbost to the south. The area forms part of the Lewis Peatlands, one of the most important areas for wildlife in Scotland. In this audio extract, a Lewis resident describes some of the wildlife that can be seen from the coast at Bragar.

When the tide is out, there are small beaches along here where the two seals are swimming just now. And here, of course, on the small beach there, you get ringed plover, redshank, turnstone, oyster catcher. All of these, and many others. You get the divers and the shags offshore and very, very frequently, the gannets, bless them, flying back and fore to feed their young.

Interviewer: There's a grey Atlantic cow seal, I think, isn't it?

Just beside us.

Interviewer: Looking at us. It's only about, what, thirty or forty yards away?

Yes, that's right. And up here now, very close, is Loch Ordais, which is a very good place for ducks and geese. We're just waiting for the white-front geese to come; a flock of them come this time of year and they stay with us here over winter.

Interviewer: Listening to the sea on this boulder beach, you know, this must be a lot of pebbles that have been thrown up with the winter gales...

Yes

Interviewer: ...onto, onto the beach there?

Yes, a good example of that is that you get sandstone pebbles, although there's no sandstone here. They come from beneath The Minch. We're a bit late for the best of the plants but you can see the remains of things like mugwort which was used in the past for, if cattle had urine trouble, and one of the problems here, the burr, which grows everywhere and is spreading.

Interviewer: Now, is this this plant here, looks like rhubarb?

It is. It is, very like wild rhubarb.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Wildlife on the West Coast of Lewis

ROSS: Barvas

1980s; 1990s

crofters; birds; mammals; plants; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Bragar

Bragar is a crofting township on the west coast of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, between the settlements of Arnol to the north and Shawbost to the south. The area forms part of the Lewis Peatlands, one of the most important areas for wildlife in Scotland. In this audio extract, a Lewis resident describes some of the wildlife that can be seen from the coast at Bragar. <br /> <br /> When the tide is out, there are small beaches along here where the two seals are swimming just now. And here, of course, on the small beach there, you get ringed plover, redshank, turnstone, oyster catcher. All of these, and many others. You get the divers and the shags offshore and very, very frequently, the gannets, bless them, flying back and fore to feed their young.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: There's a grey Atlantic cow seal, I think, isn't it?<br /> <br /> Just beside us.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Looking at us. It's only about, what, thirty or forty yards away?<br /> <br /> Yes, that's right. And up here now, very close, is Loch Ordais, which is a very good place for ducks and geese. We're just waiting for the white-front geese to come; a flock of them come this time of year and they stay with us here over winter.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Listening to the sea on this boulder beach, you know, this must be a lot of pebbles that have been thrown up with the winter gales...<br /> <br /> Yes<br /> <br /> Interviewer: ...onto, onto the beach there?<br /> <br /> Yes, a good example of that is that you get sandstone pebbles, although there's no sandstone here. They come from beneath The Minch. We're a bit late for the best of the plants but you can see the remains of things like mugwort which was used in the past for, if cattle had urine trouble, and one of the problems here, the burr, which grows everywhere and is spreading.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now, is this this plant here, looks like rhubarb?<br /> <br /> It is. It is, very like wild rhubarb.