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TITLE
Glencarron Platform, the former private halt for Glen Carron Lodge, in 1997
EXTERNAL ID
NRM_NBNW_KL_DS080551
PLACENAME
Glencarron
DISTRICT
Lochcarron
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochcarron
DATE OF IMAGE
1 August 1997
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Lynn Patrick
SOURCE
National Railway Museum, York
ASSET ID
20037
KEYWORDS
railway
railways
Glencarron Platform, the former private halt for Glen Carron Lodge, in 1997

Photographed in August 1997 Glencarron Platform, the former private halt for Glen Carron Lodge, was opened in 1872 and closed in 1964, trains still called here up until this date. It was the private railway station for the Lodge and was built for Shaw of Glencarron and had a single platform with semaphore signals that were operated by the passengers if they wished to stop the approaching train. Some landowners only agreed to the railway crossing their land if private stops were built by the railway company for their use.

Lady Evelyn "Zainab" (Murray) Cobbold, the eldest daughter of the 7th Earl of Dunmore, was an eccentric Victorian traveller, a Scottish aristocrat, a grandmother, a Mayfair socialite, an accomplished deerstalker, angler and gardener, a Muslim and an Arabic-speaker and lived at Glen Carron Lodge. In 1933, aged 65, she achieved celebrity status when she became the first British-born Muslim woman to perform the pilgrimage (Hajj) to Mecca. There is an account of the journey in her book 'Pilgrimage to Mecca' published in 1934. She died in 1963, aged 95, and is buried according to the precepts of Islam and, as she had stipulated, on a remote hillside on her Glencarron estate. A report of the funeral appeared in the Lahore Ahmadiyya Urdu 'Paigham Sulh' dated 13 February 1963 written by Maulana Yaqub Khan who was Head of the Woking Muslim Mission at the time. The funeral was performed by the Imam of the mission Maulana Shaikh Muhammad Tufail and took place on the afternoon of 31st January 1963. Lady Cobbold, in her wishes, stipulated that no Christian minister was to be brought to her funeral, the funeral prayers were to be said in Arabic, that she was to be buried facing Mecca and the following inscription to be inscribed on her headstone, in Arabic, 'Allahu nur-us-samawati wal ard'. These words are from the Holy Quran, ch. 24, v. 35, and mean: 'Allah is the light of the heavens and the earth'.

Background
Over one hundred years ago, two of the most picturesque railways in the world, the Kyle line and the Far North line, were built. Linking them to the rest of the UK rail network is the Highland main line. From 1997 to 2003 the National Railway Museum photographed these three lines, and from the images three exhibitions were created - 'Connection to the Kyle', 'By Firth and Flow' and 'The Highland Link'. The exhibitions were hosted on the Scottish Archive Network (SCAN) under the digital exhibition 'North by Northwest' which officially launched the National Archive of Scotland site on 5 June 2001 in Inverness. The collaboration with SCAN lasted until 2009 when 'North by Northwest' was transferred to the Am Baile website.

'North by Northwest' documents living history and records a snapshot of time in the lives of the people and the lines during the closing years of the twentieth century and the emergence of the twenty-first century. The exhibitions celebrated the impact of the Highland railways on the people, landscape and economy of the Scottish Highlands.

We acknowledge support from the following sponsors who funded the photographic survey of the Highland main line, the Kyle and the Far North lines by the National Railway Museum photographers between 1997 and 2003:

Railtrack, Railtrack-Scotland, ScotRail, EWS, Porterbrook, First Engineering, The Highland Rail Network Development Partnership, The Highland Council, Ross & Cromarty Enterprise, Caithness & Sutherland Enterprise, Safeways, Friends of the National Railway Museum, Perth & Kinross Council, and the Highland Railway Society.

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Glencarron Platform, the former private halt for Glen Carron Lodge, in 1997

ROSS: Lochcarron

1990s

railway; railways

National Railway Museum, York

North by Northwest - The Kyle Line

Photographed in August 1997 Glencarron Platform, the former private halt for Glen Carron Lodge, was opened in 1872 and closed in 1964, trains still called here up until this date. It was the private railway station for the Lodge and was built for Shaw of Glencarron and had a single platform with semaphore signals that were operated by the passengers if they wished to stop the approaching train. Some landowners only agreed to the railway crossing their land if private stops were built by the railway company for their use.<br /> <br /> Lady Evelyn "Zainab" (Murray) Cobbold, the eldest daughter of the 7th Earl of Dunmore, was an eccentric Victorian traveller, a Scottish aristocrat, a grandmother, a Mayfair socialite, an accomplished deerstalker, angler and gardener, a Muslim and an Arabic-speaker and lived at Glen Carron Lodge. In 1933, aged 65, she achieved celebrity status when she became the first British-born Muslim woman to perform the pilgrimage (Hajj) to Mecca. There is an account of the journey in her book 'Pilgrimage to Mecca' published in 1934. She died in 1963, aged 95, and is buried according to the precepts of Islam and, as she had stipulated, on a remote hillside on her Glencarron estate. A report of the funeral appeared in the Lahore Ahmadiyya Urdu 'Paigham Sulh' dated 13 February 1963 written by Maulana Yaqub Khan who was Head of the Woking Muslim Mission at the time. The funeral was performed by the Imam of the mission Maulana Shaikh Muhammad Tufail and took place on the afternoon of 31st January 1963. Lady Cobbold, in her wishes, stipulated that no Christian minister was to be brought to her funeral, the funeral prayers were to be said in Arabic, that she was to be buried facing Mecca and the following inscription to be inscribed on her headstone, in Arabic, 'Allahu nur-us-samawati wal ard'. These words are from the Holy Quran, ch. 24, v. 35, and mean: 'Allah is the light of the heavens and the earth'.<br /> <br /> Background<br /> Over one hundred years ago, two of the most picturesque railways in the world, the Kyle line and the Far North line, were built. Linking them to the rest of the UK rail network is the Highland main line. From 1997 to 2003 the National Railway Museum photographed these three lines, and from the images three exhibitions were created - 'Connection to the Kyle', 'By Firth and Flow' and 'The Highland Link'. The exhibitions were hosted on the Scottish Archive Network (SCAN) under the digital exhibition 'North by Northwest' which officially launched the National Archive of Scotland site on 5 June 2001 in Inverness. The collaboration with SCAN lasted until 2009 when 'North by Northwest' was transferred to the Am Baile website.<br /> <br /> 'North by Northwest' documents living history and records a snapshot of time in the lives of the people and the lines during the closing years of the twentieth century and the emergence of the twenty-first century. The exhibitions celebrated the impact of the Highland railways on the people, landscape and economy of the Scottish Highlands.<br /> <br /> We acknowledge support from the following sponsors who funded the photographic survey of the Highland main line, the Kyle and the Far North lines by the National Railway Museum photographers between 1997 and 2003:<br /> <br /> Railtrack, Railtrack-Scotland, ScotRail, EWS, Porterbrook, First Engineering, The Highland Rail Network Development Partnership, The Highland Council, Ross & Cromarty Enterprise, Caithness & Sutherland Enterprise, Safeways, Friends of the National Railway Museum, Perth & Kinross Council, and the Highland Railway Society.