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TITLE
Piping in the Haggis
EXTERNAL ID
PAN2_25
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1950s
CREATOR
J Nairn
SOURCE
Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)
ASSET ID
20100
KEYWORDS
piping
pipe bands
Piping in the Haggis

Inverness Girls Pipe Band piping in the haggis prior to a Burns Supper in Inverness Castle. The taller of the pipers is Sheila Reid and the other piper is Jessie Cumming.

Burns Suppers are a means of commemorating the life and work of poet Robert Burns. The ritual was started by close friends of Burns a few years after his death in 1796 as a tribute to his memory. The Supper begins with some welcoming words from the chair which are followed by the 'Selkirk Grace' :

Some hae meat and canna eat.
Some wad eat that want it:
But we hae meat and we can eat,
And sae the Lord be thanket.

It is possible to find many variations of the Selkirk Grace. This one is from the Kilmarnock Edition.

The company are then asked to stand to receive the haggis. A piper leads the chef, carrying the haggis to the top table, accompanied by a slow hand-clap. Burns' poem 'To A Haggis' is then recited and when the line "an cut you up wi' ready slight" is spoken, the haggis is sliced open. It is customary for the company to applaud the speaker then stand and toast the haggis with a glass of whisky


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Piping in the Haggis

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1950s

piping; pipe bands

Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)

Jimmy Nairn & Son

Inverness Girls Pipe Band piping in the haggis prior to a Burns Supper in Inverness Castle. The taller of the pipers is Sheila Reid and the other piper is Jessie Cumming.<br /> <br /> Burns Suppers are a means of commemorating the life and work of poet Robert Burns. The ritual was started by close friends of Burns a few years after his death in 1796 as a tribute to his memory. The Supper begins with some welcoming words from the chair which are followed by the 'Selkirk Grace' :<br /> <br /> Some hae meat and canna eat.<br /> Some wad eat that want it:<br /> But we hae meat and we can eat,<br /> And sae the Lord be thanket. <br /> <br /> It is possible to find many variations of the Selkirk Grace. This one is from the Kilmarnock Edition.<br /> <br /> The company are then asked to stand to receive the haggis. A piper leads the chef, carrying the haggis to the top table, accompanied by a slow hand-clap. Burns' poem 'To A Haggis' is then recited and when the line "an cut you up wi' ready slight" is spoken, the haggis is sliced open. It is customary for the company to applaud the speaker then stand and toast the haggis with a glass of whisky <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email the<br /> <a href="mailto: photographic.archive@highlifehighland.com">Highland Photographic Archive</a> quoting the External ID.