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TITLE
Suffolk Sheep
EXTERNAL ID
PAN2_37
PLACENAME
unidentified
PERIOD
1950s
CREATOR
J Nairn
SOURCE
Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)
ASSET ID
20104
KEYWORDS
sheep
Suffolk Sheep

Until the mid-18th century sheep were kept in the Highlands only for domestic purposes. After it was discovered that sheep could winter outside they quickly replaced black cattle on Highland pastures and dominated the regional economy until the later 19th century. Black-faced Linton sheep were the first breed to be introduced on a large scale, followed by Cheviots, whose introduction was largely as a result of the experiments of Sir John Sinclair of Ulbster, Caithness.

The Suffolk evolved from the mating of Norfolk Horn ewes with Southdown rams in the Bury St Edmunds area, these sheep were known as Southdown Norfolks, or locally, as "Black faces." They were first introduced to Scotland in 1895


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Suffolk Sheep

1950s

sheep

Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)

Jimmy Nairn & Son

Until the mid-18th century sheep were kept in the Highlands only for domestic purposes. After it was discovered that sheep could winter outside they quickly replaced black cattle on Highland pastures and dominated the regional economy until the later 19th century. Black-faced Linton sheep were the first breed to be introduced on a large scale, followed by Cheviots, whose introduction was largely as a result of the experiments of Sir John Sinclair of Ulbster, Caithness.<br /> <br /> The Suffolk evolved from the mating of Norfolk Horn ewes with Southdown rams in the Bury St Edmunds area, these sheep were known as Southdown Norfolks, or locally, as "Black faces." They were first introduced to Scotland in 1895 <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email the<br /> <a href="mailto: photographic.archive@highlifehighland.com">Highland Photographic Archive</a> quoting the External ID.