Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
The 'Astrid' on Loch Ness
EXTERNAL ID
PAN3_28
PLACENAME
Loch Ness
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
September 1952
PERIOD
1950s
CREATOR
J Nairn
SOURCE
Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)
ASSET ID
20125
KEYWORDS
boats
John Cobb
Crusader
Loch Ness
Glenurquhart
world records
water speed records
speed boats
The 'Astrid' on Loch Ness

The 'Astrid' was one of the support boats connected with John Cobb's attempt at the world water speed record on Loch Ness on 29 September 1952.

Cobb was killed during the attempt when his boat bounced and broke apart at the end of the first run at the timed mile. Before he was killed he had reached a speed of over 200mph making him the fastest man on water but not setting a new record as a second run was never completed.

A number of theories were put forward to explain the tragedy. One theory is that the engine exploded or that Cobb throttled down too quickly at the end of the first run. It was also suggested that ripples caused by a current or by another boat's wash hit the 'Crusader' causing it to bounce


This image can be purchased.
For further information about purchasing and prices please email the
Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

The 'Astrid' on Loch Ness

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1950s

boats; John Cobb; Crusader; Loch Ness; Glenurquhart; world records; water speed records; speed boats

Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)

Jimmy Nairn & Son

The 'Astrid' was one of the support boats connected with John Cobb's attempt at the world water speed record on Loch Ness on 29 September 1952.<br /> <br /> Cobb was killed during the attempt when his boat bounced and broke apart at the end of the first run at the timed mile. Before he was killed he had reached a speed of over 200mph making him the fastest man on water but not setting a new record as a second run was never completed.<br /> <br /> A number of theories were put forward to explain the tragedy. One theory is that the engine exploded or that Cobb throttled down too quickly at the end of the first run. It was also suggested that ripples caused by a current or by another boat's wash hit the 'Crusader' causing it to bounce <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email the<br /> <a href="mailto: photographic.archive@highlifehighland.com">Highland Photographic Archive</a> quoting the External ID.