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TITLE
'Crusader' being lowered into Loch Ness
EXTERNAL ID
PAN3_35
PLACENAME
Loch Ness
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
September 1952
PERIOD
1950s
CREATOR
J Nairn
SOURCE
Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)
ASSET ID
20128
KEYWORDS
boats
John Cobb
Crusader
Loch Ness
Glenurquhart
world records
water speed records
speed boats
'Crusader' being lowered into Loch Ness

John Cobb's boat, 'Crusader', being lowered into Loch Ness at Temple Pier.

In September of 1952 John Cobb, a London fur broker, made an attempt at the water speed record. His boat, the 'Crusader', was 31ft long, built of aluminium and marine ply and had a jet engine capable of 5000lb of static thrust. Before she was even in the water she had cost over £15,000. To hold the record John Cobb would have to pilot 'Crusader' over one statute mile in opposite directions and the average speed of the two runs would be calculated.

After a long wait for perfect conditions, John Cobb made his record attempt on the 29 September 1952. 'Crusader' completed the first mile at a speed of over 200mph but as she decelerated she bounced twice and broke apart. John Cobb's body was recovered almost imediately but was dead before they could reach the shore. A memorial cairn was erected in his memory by the people of Glenurquhart and stands by the A82, three-and-a-half miles south of Drumnadrochit.

Although Cobb became the fastest man on water just before he died, his record cannot be counted no second run was made.

A number of theories were put forward to explain the tragedy. One theory is that the engine exploded or that Cobb throttled down too quickly at the end of the first run. It was also suggested that ripples caused by a current or by another boat's wash hit the 'Crusader' causing it to bounce


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'Crusader' being lowered into Loch Ness

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1950s

boats; John Cobb; Crusader; Loch Ness; Glenurquhart; world records; water speed records; speed boats

Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)

Jimmy Nairn & Son

John Cobb's boat, 'Crusader', being lowered into Loch Ness at Temple Pier.<br /> <br /> In September of 1952 John Cobb, a London fur broker, made an attempt at the water speed record. His boat, the 'Crusader', was 31ft long, built of aluminium and marine ply and had a jet engine capable of 5000lb of static thrust. Before she was even in the water she had cost over £15,000. To hold the record John Cobb would have to pilot 'Crusader' over one statute mile in opposite directions and the average speed of the two runs would be calculated.<br /> <br /> After a long wait for perfect conditions, John Cobb made his record attempt on the 29 September 1952. 'Crusader' completed the first mile at a speed of over 200mph but as she decelerated she bounced twice and broke apart. John Cobb's body was recovered almost imediately but was dead before they could reach the shore. A memorial cairn was erected in his memory by the people of Glenurquhart and stands by the A82, three-and-a-half miles south of Drumnadrochit.<br /> <br /> Although Cobb became the fastest man on water just before he died, his record cannot be counted no second run was made.<br /> <br /> A number of theories were put forward to explain the tragedy. One theory is that the engine exploded or that Cobb throttled down too quickly at the end of the first run. It was also suggested that ripples caused by a current or by another boat's wash hit the 'Crusader' causing it to bounce <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email the<br /> <a href="mailto: photographic.archive@highlifehighland.com">Highland Photographic Archive</a> quoting the External ID.