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TITLE
Caithness defences during the war
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_HIGHRAILWAY_04
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2013
KEYWORDS
Second World War
transportation
audio

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During World War II the Highland railways played an important role, transporting freight and troops to and from the naval bases, airfields, coastal defences, and supply bases throughout the region. In this audio extract, a former railway employee remembers transporting wooden defence poles.

'The first thing that we had in there, that you could refer to as being war traffic, was defence poles which was positioned throughout all the fields around because, as you well know, Caithness is a flat country and there's no trees and immediately after Dunkirk they were alarmed that there could possibly be an invasion in the far north, and this was to wreck any gliders that the enemy could get landed in the open spaces because it's purely agricultural country'

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Caithness defences during the war

1980s

Second World War; transportation; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Highland Railways

During World War II the Highland railways played an important role, transporting freight and troops to and from the naval bases, airfields, coastal defences, and supply bases throughout the region. In this audio extract, a former railway employee remembers transporting wooden defence poles.<br /> <br /> 'The first thing that we had in there, that you could refer to as being war traffic, was defence poles which was positioned throughout all the fields around because, as you well know, Caithness is a flat country and there's no trees and immediately after Dunkirk they were alarmed that there could possibly be an invasion in the far north, and this was to wreck any gliders that the enemy could get landed in the open spaces because it's purely agricultural country'