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TITLE
Timber freight on the railway during the war
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_HIGHRAILWAY_12
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2025
KEYWORDS
Second World War
transportation
lumberjacks
audio

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During World War II the Highland railways played an important role, transporting freight and troops to and from the naval bases, airfields, coastal defences, and supply bases throughout the region. In this audio extract, a former railway employee recalls transporting timber, much of which would have been sent down south to be used as pit-props.

'There were at least twenty timber loading stations. The Canadian Forestry Corps had a lot of places where they cut and loaded timber; Carrbridge, Boat of Garten, Broomhill, and our own Forestry Commission, as it was then, cut a lot of timber. Plus, of course, the private firms such as Jones, Riddochs of Rothiemay, Frank Sime, Inverness, John MacDonald, Inverness. But the heaviest timber loading station was, without doubt, Carrbridge, where you had the Canadians' Forestry Corps and the Newfoundlands; sometimes as many as eighty wagons of timber a day; that was for six days a week. Two specials trains conveyed that timber to the south to Grangemouth, and in the latter part of the war they were worked by Class Eight W.D. locomotives'

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Timber freight on the railway during the war

1980s

Second World War; transportation; lumberjacks; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Highland Railways

During World War II the Highland railways played an important role, transporting freight and troops to and from the naval bases, airfields, coastal defences, and supply bases throughout the region. In this audio extract, a former railway employee recalls transporting timber, much of which would have been sent down south to be used as pit-props.<br /> <br /> 'There were at least twenty timber loading stations. The Canadian Forestry Corps had a lot of places where they cut and loaded timber; Carrbridge, Boat of Garten, Broomhill, and our own Forestry Commission, as it was then, cut a lot of timber. Plus, of course, the private firms such as Jones, Riddochs of Rothiemay, Frank Sime, Inverness, John MacDonald, Inverness. But the heaviest timber loading station was, without doubt, Carrbridge, where you had the Canadians' Forestry Corps and the Newfoundlands; sometimes as many as eighty wagons of timber a day; that was for six days a week. Two specials trains conveyed that timber to the south to Grangemouth, and in the latter part of the war they were worked by Class Eight W.D. locomotives'