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TITLE
Freight congestion during the war
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_HIGHRAILWAY_13
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2026
KEYWORDS
Second World War
transportation
audio

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During World War II the Highland railways played an important role, transporting freight and troops to and from the naval bases, airfields, coastal defences, and supply bases throughout the region. In this audio extract, a former railway employee recalls the congestion caused by the increased traffic.

'We were dealing with about ninety wagons a day. There was always another thirty to forty wagons that you couldn't find the room for. At night, they pushed this thirty or forty wagons down what they call the tramway; that's the railway route to the harbour. And the first thing in the morning, they had to lift this wagons to clear the harbour road and they put them on one of the main lines. And there were wagons there practically all day. We had to shift the trains from one line to the other for trains to pass, and at night this wagons were taken and put down to the tramway again'

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Freight congestion during the war

1980s

Second World War; transportation; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Highland Railways

During World War II the Highland railways played an important role, transporting freight and troops to and from the naval bases, airfields, coastal defences, and supply bases throughout the region. In this audio extract, a former railway employee recalls the congestion caused by the increased traffic.<br /> <br /> 'We were dealing with about ninety wagons a day. There was always another thirty to forty wagons that you couldn't find the room for. At night, they pushed this thirty or forty wagons down what they call the tramway; that's the railway route to the harbour. And the first thing in the morning, they had to lift this wagons to clear the harbour road and they put them on one of the main lines. And there were wagons there practically all day. We had to shift the trains from one line to the other for trains to pass, and at night this wagons were taken and put down to the tramway again'