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TITLE
Transport of fish and livestock during the war
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_HIGHRAILWAY_14
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2028
KEYWORDS
Second World War
transportation
audio

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During World War II the Highland railways played an important role, transporting freight and troops to and from the naval bases, airfields, coastal defences, and supply bases throughout the region. In this audio extract, a former railway employee recalls transporting fish and livestock.

'Kyle, of course, was closed as a fishing port; the boats were directed to Gairloch and Ullapool. The fish was conveyed to the railhead at Achnasheen, Garve, by a lorry. In 1943, we put - they sent out the heaviest fish special to be known in the north, and that fish special carried thirty-two vans of fish. Not, mark you, twenty boxes in a van, but a hundred and twenty boxes in a van.

Road transport, as it was then, was curtailed very much on a very limited mileage and they couldn't run to the sheep farms in north England with their loads, with the result that the sheep from the special sales at Thurso, Lairg, Wick, Dingwall, all went by rail'

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Transport of fish and livestock during the war

1980s

Second World War; transportation; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Highland Railways

During World War II the Highland railways played an important role, transporting freight and troops to and from the naval bases, airfields, coastal defences, and supply bases throughout the region. In this audio extract, a former railway employee recalls transporting fish and livestock.<br /> <br /> 'Kyle, of course, was closed as a fishing port; the boats were directed to Gairloch and Ullapool. The fish was conveyed to the railhead at Achnasheen, Garve, by a lorry. In 1943, we put - they sent out the heaviest fish special to be known in the north, and that fish special carried thirty-two vans of fish. Not, mark you, twenty boxes in a van, but a hundred and twenty boxes in a van. <br /> <br /> Road transport, as it was then, was curtailed very much on a very limited mileage and they couldn't run to the sheep farms in north England with their loads, with the result that the sheep from the special sales at Thurso, Lairg, Wick, Dingwall, all went by rail'