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TITLE
Curlers, 1954
EXTERNAL ID
PAN_10_34
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1950s
CREATOR
J Nairn
SOURCE
Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)
ASSET ID
20334
KEYWORDS
curling
Curlers, 1954

The precise origins of curling are unknown though the earliest curling stone, found near Stirling, bears the date 1511. In 1838, the Grand Caledonian Curling Club (later renamed Royal Caledonian Curling Club) was formed with the aim of establishing standardised rules of the game.

The Inverness Curling Club was instituted in 1898 and admitted to the Royal Caledonian Club the following year. Their rinks were at Kingsmills. During the season of 1922-3 only 3 playing days were possible, the fewest ever recorded. In 1946-7 there were 53 playing days, significantly higher than the average of 12 to 18.

Modern curling stones are 30 cm wide and 11 cm high. They are made from a shock-absorbing granite and weigh approximately nine kilograms. The path of the stone on the ice is controlled by players sweeping the ice in front of it. This reduces friction between the ice and the stone, clears any debris from the ice and can also affect the curl of the stone. The object is to get as many stones closer to a pre-determined point on the ice (the button) than your opponent's nearest stone


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Curlers, 1954

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1950s

curling

Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)

Jimmy Nairn & Son

The precise origins of curling are unknown though the earliest curling stone, found near Stirling, bears the date 1511. In 1838, the Grand Caledonian Curling Club (later renamed Royal Caledonian Curling Club) was formed with the aim of establishing standardised rules of the game. <br /> <br /> The Inverness Curling Club was instituted in 1898 and admitted to the Royal Caledonian Club the following year. Their rinks were at Kingsmills. During the season of 1922-3 only 3 playing days were possible, the fewest ever recorded. In 1946-7 there were 53 playing days, significantly higher than the average of 12 to 18.<br /> <br /> Modern curling stones are 30 cm wide and 11 cm high. They are made from a shock-absorbing granite and weigh approximately nine kilograms. The path of the stone on the ice is controlled by players sweeping the ice in front of it. This reduces friction between the ice and the stone, clears any debris from the ice and can also affect the curl of the stone. The object is to get as many stones closer to a pre-determined point on the ice (the button) than your opponent's nearest stone <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email the<br /> <a href="mailto: photographic.archive@highlifehighland.com">Highland Photographic Archive</a> quoting the External ID.