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TITLE
An Australian in the Highlands (3 of 3)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_JIMMYJAMES_03
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Jimmy James
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2039
KEYWORDS
bird watching
ornithology
audio

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In this audio recording from the 1980s, Bill Sinclair is chatting with Australian visitor, Jimmy James, in the hills above Whitebridge in Stratherrick, on the south-eastern side of Loch Ness. Jimmy is a keen naturalist and bird watcher and makes interesting comparisons between the Highlands of Scotland and the Highlands of Australia.

Interviewer: One thing you must notice, Jim, is the size of the Highlands compared with Australia? Anything special that stands out there?

Yes. Actually, a thing that is interesting here, we're always led to understand that England is a very small place, or British Isles is a very small place, and everything is crammed one on top of the other. Well, now yesterday, when I went across right over to the west coast, I was amazed at the space and breadth of the place, and the remoteness, even of the crofts. We were driving for miles without seeing a soul, without seeing a house, and there are so many wild places up here, and we think, we in Australia, think that there are no wild places at all; nobody has room to put a foot in the British Isles and I can assure anyone in Australia now, that there is plenty of room to walk unmolested for miles and miles and miles. The park close to where I live, Kosciuszko National Park, that it is a million and a third acres in size, which must surely be about the size of Scotland, would it be?

Interviewer: Yes, it must be.

That is huge. But even in that we do have our traffic problems, particularly in the snow season, because there's a lot of snow development and skiing development there, and there are a lot of roads that cut across the park. And also there is - has been - a lot of man's influence in the area but this has been stopped since the National Parks and Wildlife Service took over in 1944, where all grazing was stopped in the alpine district, particularly, because the erosion was becoming so bad through overgrazing, burning off, and just general mismanagement of the land use.

Interviewer: Yes

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An Australian in the Highlands (3 of 3)

1980s

bird watching; ornithology; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: An Australian in the Highlands

In this audio recording from the 1980s, Bill Sinclair is chatting with Australian visitor, Jimmy James, in the hills above Whitebridge in Stratherrick, on the south-eastern side of Loch Ness. Jimmy is a keen naturalist and bird watcher and makes interesting comparisons between the Highlands of Scotland and the Highlands of Australia.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: One thing you must notice, Jim, is the size of the Highlands compared with Australia? Anything special that stands out there?<br /> <br /> Yes. Actually, a thing that is interesting here, we're always led to understand that England is a very small place, or British Isles is a very small place, and everything is crammed one on top of the other. Well, now yesterday, when I went across right over to the west coast, I was amazed at the space and breadth of the place, and the remoteness, even of the crofts. We were driving for miles without seeing a soul, without seeing a house, and there are so many wild places up here, and we think, we in Australia, think that there are no wild places at all; nobody has room to put a foot in the British Isles and I can assure anyone in Australia now, that there is plenty of room to walk unmolested for miles and miles and miles. The park close to where I live, Kosciuszko National Park, that it is a million and a third acres in size, which must surely be about the size of Scotland, would it be?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes, it must be.<br /> <br /> That is huge. But even in that we do have our traffic problems, particularly in the snow season, because there's a lot of snow development and skiing development there, and there are a lot of roads that cut across the park. And also there is - has been - a lot of man's influence in the area but this has been stopped since the National Parks and Wildlife Service took over in 1944, where all grazing was stopped in the alpine district, particularly, because the erosion was becoming so bad through overgrazing, burning off, and just general mismanagement of the land use. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes