Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Culloden Anniversary Service, 1954
EXTERNAL ID
PAN_13_17
PLACENAME
Culloden
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF IMAGE
1954
PERIOD
1950s
CREATOR
J Nairn
SOURCE
Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)
ASSET ID
20392
KEYWORDS
battles
Culloden
army
battles
Bonnie Prince Charlie
Jacobites
piping
Culloden Anniversary Service, 1954

The annual service to commemorate the Battle of Culloden has been organised by Comunn Gàidhlig Inbhir Nis (The Gaelic Society of Inverness) since the 1920s. It is usually held on the nearest Saturday to the 16th April. Wreaths are laid at the battlefield cairn as a lone piper plays a lament.

The inscription on the 20 feet high cairn reads :

"THE BATTLE OF CULLODEN WAS FOUGHT ON THIS MOOR 16TH APRIL 1746. THE GRAVES OF THE GALLANT HIGHLANDERS WHO FOUGHT FOR SCOTLAND & PRINCE CHARLIE ARE MARKED BY THE NAMES OF THEIR CLANS."

The Battle of Culloden took place on 16 April 1746 between the Jacobite supporters of Prince Charles Edward Stuart and the army of the Hanoverian King George II. It was the culmination of a civil war fought over religious and political beliefs which divided both clan and country. Discontent with the rule of the Catholic King James VII of Scotland & II of England led to William of Orange being invited to contest the throne in 1688 prompting James to flee to France. The Jacobite rebellion of 1745-6 (known as 'the Forty-Five') was the last of several unsuccessful attempts to restore the Stuart dynasty to the monarchy.

The Jacobite Standard was raised on 19 August 1745 at Glenfinnan with Charles Edward proclaimed as Regent and his father as King James VIII and III. His army marched towards London but received less support in England that had been expected. A decision was taken to return to the Highlands. An army commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland and youngest son of George II pursued them. The two armies met on Drumossie Moor (as Culloden was then known). The Jacobites were outnumbered, poorly equipped and lacking in firepower, munitions and cavalry. They had marched all the previous night on an abortive foray and they were hungry (their food supplies having been left in Inverness). In addition, the battleground suited Cumberland's cavalry and canon and was wholly unsuitable for the Jacobites' most effective tactic - the charge. The Jacobites were routed in less than an hour


This image can be purchased.
For further information about purchasing and prices please email the
Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Culloden Anniversary Service, 1954

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1950s

battles; Culloden; army; battles; Bonnie Prince Charlie; Jacobites; piping

Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)

Jimmy Nairn & Son

The annual service to commemorate the Battle of Culloden has been organised by Comunn Gàidhlig Inbhir Nis (The Gaelic Society of Inverness) since the 1920s. It is usually held on the nearest Saturday to the 16th April. Wreaths are laid at the battlefield cairn as a lone piper plays a lament.<br /> <br /> The inscription on the 20 feet high cairn reads :<br /> <br /> "THE BATTLE OF CULLODEN WAS FOUGHT ON THIS MOOR 16TH APRIL 1746. THE GRAVES OF THE GALLANT HIGHLANDERS WHO FOUGHT FOR SCOTLAND & PRINCE CHARLIE ARE MARKED BY THE NAMES OF THEIR CLANS."<br /> <br /> The Battle of Culloden took place on 16 April 1746 between the Jacobite supporters of Prince Charles Edward Stuart and the army of the Hanoverian King George II. It was the culmination of a civil war fought over religious and political beliefs which divided both clan and country. Discontent with the rule of the Catholic King James VII of Scotland & II of England led to William of Orange being invited to contest the throne in 1688 prompting James to flee to France. The Jacobite rebellion of 1745-6 (known as 'the Forty-Five') was the last of several unsuccessful attempts to restore the Stuart dynasty to the monarchy.<br /> <br /> The Jacobite Standard was raised on 19 August 1745 at Glenfinnan with Charles Edward proclaimed as Regent and his father as King James VIII and III. His army marched towards London but received less support in England that had been expected. A decision was taken to return to the Highlands. An army commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland and youngest son of George II pursued them. The two armies met on Drumossie Moor (as Culloden was then known). The Jacobites were outnumbered, poorly equipped and lacking in firepower, munitions and cavalry. They had marched all the previous night on an abortive foray and they were hungry (their food supplies having been left in Inverness). In addition, the battleground suited Cumberland's cavalry and canon and was wholly unsuitable for the Jacobites' most effective tactic - the charge. The Jacobites were routed in less than an hour <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email the<br /> <a href="mailto: photographic.archive@highlifehighland.com">Highland Photographic Archive</a> quoting the External ID.