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TITLE
Jimmy Nairn, the 'Movieman' (1 of 3)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_JIMMYNAIRN_01
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Jimmy Nairn
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2041
KEYWORDS
cinemas
audio

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Scottish amateur film producer and director, Ron Miller, created a film in 1979 called 'Movieman'; a documentary about the life of Jimmy Nairn, Inverness cinema manager, photographer, and amateur film maker. The documentary was shown to an appreciative audience, including Mr. Nairn himself, at La Scala cinema, Inverness. In this audio extract, Bill Sinclair asks Jimmy what he thought of the documentary. The photograph shows Jimmy (pictured left) in his photographic shop in Inverness. The other gentleman may be his son.

Interviewer: Now, after seeing this film of your life, what do you think of it?

Well, I think Ron Miller, director and producer, made a wonderful job of a film which could have been a very dry subject of one's life in the cinema business over the past sixty years. The film was so beautifully knit together, with the stuff I had supplied Mr. Miller with, plus the amount of stuff he had to research in the various parts of the country - universities, town councils and so on - and to knit all that stuff together to make a story of one's life meant such a lot in the making of that film, because to hold an audience you've got to hold an interest and you've got to give them something which will rivet their attention on what's taking place on the screen. To my mind, I thought it was wonderful. Secondly, to have a film made on one's own life, covering a period of sixty-odd years, was a real thriller to me. Frankly, while watching the picture, I had not realised I had done so much in my lifetime, and I only wish I had to live it all over again because every minute was enjoyed in any of the things portrayed on the film in which I did. It's truly a marvellous production. The - with the fire we had at the Playhouse, a lot of my original stuff was lost hence it made it more difficult for Mr. Miller to trace copies of this, that and the next thing, to knit together, to make up his story, either in still montage, or in the continuity of actual movie films which I'd made over the years.

Interviewer: Looking at the film I noticed, especially the local cuts, there was a lot of very well known Inverness people to be seen, especially during the Freedom Ceremonies. Is this, a lot of this film been made by you, or is it from other sources?

Yea, all, all that stuff was made by myself. All the films of parades on November, parades to churches, school sports, people arriving, important people arriving at the Playhouse for Freedom of Burgh ceremonies, all that stuff was my own film which Ronnie managed to recover from many other sources as my negatives had been lost. The people showed a great interest in the - especially the Inverness people - watching that film and watching for people whom they could recognise, or watching for themselves as they looked twenty, thirty, thirty-five years ago. To them it gave a great thrill, and they felt those scenes should have been held longer so as they could look through the crowd of faces to see what friends they could recognise. In all my film making I always included crowd scenes because I knew crowd scenes was the sort of thing that people would enjoy, seeing their friends or seeing themselves, as they were at the time of the film, or in years later

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Jimmy Nairn, the 'Movieman' (1 of 3)

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1980s; 1990s

cinemas; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Jimmy Nairn

Scottish amateur film producer and director, Ron Miller, created a film in 1979 called 'Movieman'; a documentary about the life of Jimmy Nairn, Inverness cinema manager, photographer, and amateur film maker. The documentary was shown to an appreciative audience, including Mr. Nairn himself, at La Scala cinema, Inverness. In this audio extract, Bill Sinclair asks Jimmy what he thought of the documentary. The photograph shows Jimmy (pictured left) in his photographic shop in Inverness. The other gentleman may be his son.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now, after seeing this film of your life, what do you think of it?<br /> <br /> Well, I think Ron Miller, director and producer, made a wonderful job of a film which could have been a very dry subject of one's life in the cinema business over the past sixty years. The film was so beautifully knit together, with the stuff I had supplied Mr. Miller with, plus the amount of stuff he had to research in the various parts of the country - universities, town councils and so on - and to knit all that stuff together to make a story of one's life meant such a lot in the making of that film, because to hold an audience you've got to hold an interest and you've got to give them something which will rivet their attention on what's taking place on the screen. To my mind, I thought it was wonderful. Secondly, to have a film made on one's own life, covering a period of sixty-odd years, was a real thriller to me. Frankly, while watching the picture, I had not realised I had done so much in my lifetime, and I only wish I had to live it all over again because every minute was enjoyed in any of the things portrayed on the film in which I did. It's truly a marvellous production. The - with the fire we had at the Playhouse, a lot of my original stuff was lost hence it made it more difficult for Mr. Miller to trace copies of this, that and the next thing, to knit together, to make up his story, either in still montage, or in the continuity of actual movie films which I'd made over the years.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Looking at the film I noticed, especially the local cuts, there was a lot of very well known Inverness people to be seen, especially during the Freedom Ceremonies. Is this, a lot of this film been made by you, or is it from other sources?<br /> <br /> Yea, all, all that stuff was made by myself. All the films of parades on November, parades to churches, school sports, people arriving, important people arriving at the Playhouse for Freedom of Burgh ceremonies, all that stuff was my own film which Ronnie managed to recover from many other sources as my negatives had been lost. The people showed a great interest in the - especially the Inverness people - watching that film and watching for people whom they could recognise, or watching for themselves as they looked twenty, thirty, thirty-five years ago. To them it gave a great thrill, and they felt those scenes should have been held longer so as they could look through the crowd of faces to see what friends they could recognise. In all my film making I always included crowd scenes because I knew crowd scenes was the sort of thing that people would enjoy, seeing their friends or seeing themselves, as they were at the time of the film, or in years later