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TITLE
Jimmy Nairn, the 'Movieman' (2 of 3)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_JIMMYNAIRN_02
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Jimmy Nairn
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2042
KEYWORDS
cinemas
audio

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Scottish amateur film producer and director, Ron Miller, created a film in 1979 called 'Movieman'; a documentary about the life of Jimmy Nairn, Inverness cinema manager, photographer, and amateur film maker. The documentary was shown to an appreciative audience, including Mr. Nairn himself, at La Scala cinema, Inverness. In this audio extract, Jimmy relates two of his most memorable assignments. The photograph shows the Freedom of the Burgh ceremony at the Playhouse.

Interviewer: What is the most interesting, or most memorable piece of film you've ever photographed?

Oh, the one that thrills me most - two really - one, was spending three days at Balmoral Castle in which I had been commissioned in 1941 to film the King and Queen in residence there, and taking the salute of the Queens Own Cameron Highlanders who were the regiment on guard at the time. That was a thrill. The King and Queen were so charming. They spoke to you in ordinary ways during your filming, and the second day, while I was taking fill-in shots, the King and Queen and the Princesses, came along, watched me filming a worm's eye view of the sunk gardens. I was actually at the time taking a shot of a rose tree trimmed to represent the imperial crown. While I was doing this, I was lying on my stomach. I heard voices at the balustrade and looking up, here were the King and Queen and the Princesses looking down, enjoying my motions in the camera, lying on the grass. I stopped, looked at the King, and he said, 'Carry on, with your worm's eye view'. I'll remember those wonderful words. Then, when I finished this shot, I stood up and they all waved which I filmed at the time, and they're saying, 'Cheerio, cheerio'. That stands out in my memory.

The other one was when the Queen was granted - that is the Queen Mother now, the Queen at the time - was granted the Freedom of the Burgh of Inverness. That was a wonderful experience, and her coming to the Playhouse, coming onto the stage where I designed the setting for the occasion. And that also stands out in my memory, very much indeed. In fact, all these Freedom of Burgh ceremonies which I staged were wonderful things, with the Princess Royal and other famous people getting the Freedom of the Burgh, and they live in my memory very much so; people who deserved the honour of the Freedom of the Burgh for things they had done for the community and for humanity as a whole

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Jimmy Nairn, the 'Movieman' (2 of 3)

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1980s; 1990s

cinemas; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Jimmy Nairn

Scottish amateur film producer and director, Ron Miller, created a film in 1979 called 'Movieman'; a documentary about the life of Jimmy Nairn, Inverness cinema manager, photographer, and amateur film maker. The documentary was shown to an appreciative audience, including Mr. Nairn himself, at La Scala cinema, Inverness. In this audio extract, Jimmy relates two of his most memorable assignments. The photograph shows the Freedom of the Burgh ceremony at the Playhouse.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What is the most interesting, or most memorable piece of film you've ever photographed?<br /> <br /> Oh, the one that thrills me most - two really - one, was spending three days at Balmoral Castle in which I had been commissioned in 1941 to film the King and Queen in residence there, and taking the salute of the Queens Own Cameron Highlanders who were the regiment on guard at the time. That was a thrill. The King and Queen were so charming. They spoke to you in ordinary ways during your filming, and the second day, while I was taking fill-in shots, the King and Queen and the Princesses, came along, watched me filming a worm's eye view of the sunk gardens. I was actually at the time taking a shot of a rose tree trimmed to represent the imperial crown. While I was doing this, I was lying on my stomach. I heard voices at the balustrade and looking up, here were the King and Queen and the Princesses looking down, enjoying my motions in the camera, lying on the grass. I stopped, looked at the King, and he said, 'Carry on, with your worm's eye view'. I'll remember those wonderful words. Then, when I finished this shot, I stood up and they all waved which I filmed at the time, and they're saying, 'Cheerio, cheerio'. That stands out in my memory.<br /> <br /> The other one was when the Queen was granted - that is the Queen Mother now, the Queen at the time - was granted the Freedom of the Burgh of Inverness. That was a wonderful experience, and her coming to the Playhouse, coming onto the stage where I designed the setting for the occasion. And that also stands out in my memory, very much indeed. In fact, all these Freedom of Burgh ceremonies which I staged were wonderful things, with the Princess Royal and other famous people getting the Freedom of the Burgh, and they live in my memory very much so; people who deserved the honour of the Freedom of the Burgh for things they had done for the community and for humanity as a whole