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TITLE
The Isle of Rum: A Short History (3 of 5)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_JOHNLOVE_03
PLACENAME
Rum
DISTRICT
Lochaber
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Small Isles
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
John Love
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2048
KEYWORDS
Rhum
audio

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John Love is perhaps best known for his efforts in achieving the return of the sea eagle to Scotland, on the Island of Rum, in 1975. He has also published various books and articles on the history and natural history of the Hebrides, including Rum and St Kilda. In this audio extract from 1983, Bill Sinclair talks to John about his recently-published book, 'The Isle of Rum: A Short History'.

Interviewer: I notice some very interesting drawings which I understand you've actually done yourself to illustrate this book, but, of different Celtic stones and things. Is anything you've found there, John, that is perhaps unique?

I don't think Rum has very much unique, and probably compared with the other Hebridean Islands, or some other Hebridean Islands, it doesn't have as many antiquities as it might, but there are two Celtic crosses which are of very great interest and I was able to get a rubbing of the design on one of the stones, which was badly weathered and badly encrusted with lichen, and by turning the stone over the lichen gradually died off and I was able to discern a bit more of the carving. The other stone had been found four years ago, five years ago, lying on the beach, by two schoolboys and they photographed it and sent it to the Royal Commission on Ancient Monuments in Edinburgh, but nobody on the island knew of it at the time and the stone disappeared again. And I managed to find it last summer. It was lying on the beach below the high water back and almost totally buried in sand so that it was quite a fortunate find and we've been able to drag it up the beach and set it upright again. So that was something that was lost and we've since managed to restore it

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The Isle of Rum: A Short History (3 of 5)

INVERNESS: Small Isles

1980s

Rhum; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: History of Rum

John Love is perhaps best known for his efforts in achieving the return of the sea eagle to Scotland, on the Island of Rum, in 1975. He has also published various books and articles on the history and natural history of the Hebrides, including Rum and St Kilda. In this audio extract from 1983, Bill Sinclair talks to John about his recently-published book, 'The Isle of Rum: A Short History'.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I notice some very interesting drawings which I understand you've actually done yourself to illustrate this book, but, of different Celtic stones and things. Is anything you've found there, John, that is perhaps unique?<br /> <br /> I don't think Rum has very much unique, and probably compared with the other Hebridean Islands, or some other Hebridean Islands, it doesn't have as many antiquities as it might, but there are two Celtic crosses which are of very great interest and I was able to get a rubbing of the design on one of the stones, which was badly weathered and badly encrusted with lichen, and by turning the stone over the lichen gradually died off and I was able to discern a bit more of the carving. The other stone had been found four years ago, five years ago, lying on the beach, by two schoolboys and they photographed it and sent it to the Royal Commission on Ancient Monuments in Edinburgh, but nobody on the island knew of it at the time and the stone disappeared again. And I managed to find it last summer. It was lying on the beach below the high water back and almost totally buried in sand so that it was quite a fortunate find and we've been able to drag it up the beach and set it upright again. So that was something that was lost and we've since managed to restore it