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TITLE
Loading vehicles onto the Kessock ferry, MV 'Eilean Dubh'
EXTERNAL ID
PAN_17_KESSOCKFERRY2
PLACENAME
South Kessock
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1950s
CREATOR
J Nairn
SOURCE
Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)
ASSET ID
20526
KEYWORDS
ferries
piers
bridges
ferry boats
Loading vehicles onto the Kessock ferry, MV 'Eilean Dubh'

In 1825 Sir William Fettes bought the estate of Redcastle, on the Black Isle, for £135,000. This purchase included the rights to operate the ferry at Kessock, linking Inverness with the Black Isle. Within three years he had introduced steam-powered boats on the route and built new piers.



In 1939 Inverness Town Council and Ross and Cromarty County Council took control of the service and it remained in their hands until the bridge was opened in 1982. Vehicles were carried from the late 1940s when the MV 'Eilean Dubh' was introduced on the service. This vessel was capable of carrying eight cars. The 'Inbhir Nis', with a four-vehicle capacity, was added in the 1950s. A purpose-built, roll-on roll-off ferry 'Rosehaugh' was introduced in 1967 with MV 'Eilean Dubh' relegated to the role of relief vessel





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For further information about purchasing and prices please email the

Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID.

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Loading vehicles onto the Kessock ferry, MV 'Eilean Dubh'

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1950s

ferries; piers; bridges; ferry boats

Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)

Jimmy Nairn & Son

In 1825 Sir William Fettes bought the estate of Redcastle, on the Black Isle, for £135,000. This purchase included the rights to operate the ferry at Kessock, linking Inverness with the Black Isle. Within three years he had introduced steam-powered boats on the route and built new piers.<br /><br /> <br /><br /> In 1939 Inverness Town Council and Ross and Cromarty County Council took control of the service and it remained in their hands until the bridge was opened in 1982. Vehicles were carried from the late 1940s when the MV 'Eilean Dubh' was introduced on the service. This vessel was capable of carrying eight cars. The 'Inbhir Nis', with a four-vehicle capacity, was added in the 1950s. A purpose-built, roll-on roll-off ferry 'Rosehaugh' was introduced in 1967 with MV 'Eilean Dubh' relegated to the role of relief vessel <br /><br /> <br /><br /> <br /><br /> This image can be purchased.<br /><br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email the<br /><br /> <a href="mailto: photographic.archive@highlifehighland.com">Highland Photographic Archive</a> quoting the External ID.