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TITLE
Objections to the Dingwall & Skye Railway
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_JOHNTHOMAS_02
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
John Thomas
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2062
KEYWORDS
Highland Railway
railways
transport
audio

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The Dingwall and Skye Railway was opened in 1870 but only went as far as Strome Ferry on Loch Carron. It would be another twenty-seven years before the railway reached the terminus at Kyle of Lochalsh. In this audio extract, John Thomas (1914-1982), one of Britain's leading railway historians, talks about objections to the original railway route. The recording was made on board a special excursion train to Kyle of Lochalsh in 1973.

The railway had difficulty in getting away even from Dingwall. A local landowner objected to the line passing along the north bank of the Dingwall Canal and wanted it moved to the south bank. John Miller, civil engineer, condemned the suggested deviation as expensive and dangerous but in spite of that verdict the disgruntled landowner took his case to court. He withdrew his objection when the railway company agreed to make him a gift of £5000 in shares.

Much more serious trouble was encountered at Fodderty Junction, where the now defunct branch line to Strathpeffer left the main line. The line was planned to carry on down Strathpeffer, to Strathpeffer Village, and then follow the valley of the Blackwater to the east end of Loch Garve, an easy route. But the railway promoters had not reckoned with the truculent and avaricious landowners. Soon the chairman was reporting to the board, 'In consequence of the great demands of landowners and the expensive nature of the works on the Strathpeffer site, it is possible a deviation from the parliamentary plan in that locality will be applied for'. And deviation there had to be.

The principal obstruction, of course, was the refusal of local landowners to allow the railway to pass through Strathpeffer and the leading campaigner against this plan was Sir William MacKenzie of Coul. The railway came within half a mile of his house and it also traversed four and a half miles of his land. He was the principal instigator but he had fairly general support in the Strathpeffer area

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Objections to the Dingwall & Skye Railway

ROSS

1980s; 1990s

Highland Railway; railways; transport; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Dingwall & Skye Railway

The Dingwall and Skye Railway was opened in 1870 but only went as far as Strome Ferry on Loch Carron. It would be another twenty-seven years before the railway reached the terminus at Kyle of Lochalsh. In this audio extract, John Thomas (1914-1982), one of Britain's leading railway historians, talks about objections to the original railway route. The recording was made on board a special excursion train to Kyle of Lochalsh in 1973.<br /> <br /> The railway had difficulty in getting away even from Dingwall. A local landowner objected to the line passing along the north bank of the Dingwall Canal and wanted it moved to the south bank. John Miller, civil engineer, condemned the suggested deviation as expensive and dangerous but in spite of that verdict the disgruntled landowner took his case to court. He withdrew his objection when the railway company agreed to make him a gift of £5000 in shares. <br /> <br /> Much more serious trouble was encountered at Fodderty Junction, where the now defunct branch line to Strathpeffer left the main line. The line was planned to carry on down Strathpeffer, to Strathpeffer Village, and then follow the valley of the Blackwater to the east end of Loch Garve, an easy route. But the railway promoters had not reckoned with the truculent and avaricious landowners. Soon the chairman was reporting to the board, 'In consequence of the great demands of landowners and the expensive nature of the works on the Strathpeffer site, it is possible a deviation from the parliamentary plan in that locality will be applied for'. And deviation there had to be. <br /> <br /> The principal obstruction, of course, was the refusal of local landowners to allow the railway to pass through Strathpeffer and the leading campaigner against this plan was Sir William MacKenzie of Coul. The railway came within half a mile of his house and it also traversed four and a half miles of his land. He was the principal instigator but he had fairly general support in the Strathpeffer area