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TITLE
Luib, Dingwall & Skye Railway
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_JOHNTHOMAS_04
PLACENAME
Luib
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
John Thomas
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2065
KEYWORDS
Highland Railway
railways
transport
audio

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The Dingwall and Skye Railway was opened in 1870 but only went as far as Strome Ferry on Loch Carron. It would be another twenty-seven years before the railway reached the terminus at Kyle of Lochalsh. In this audio extract, John Thomas (1914-1982), one of Britain's leading railway historians, talks about the line's summit at Luib. The recording was made on board a special excursion train to Kyle of Lochalsh in 1973.

This, ladies and gentlemen, is Luib, on the summit of the line, thirty-one and three quarter miles from Dingwall. It is also the watershed of the county and now we start dropping down towards Lochcarron. The summit is 646 feet above sea level. By this time you will realise that the promoters of the line and the engineers who built it hadn't their sorrows to seek. The promoters had great difficulty in getting enough money to carry the line forward. Work was always being stopped because enough money wasn't even forthcoming to pay the wages of the navvies. The principal idea was to get as quickly as possible under the shortest and easiest route to deep water, in the west. And, of course, that meant Lochcarron. At one time they decided that they hadn't enough funds to get any further than Attadale, which was the first approach to deep water. However, a few more people bought shares and they pushed on to Strome Ferry

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Luib, Dingwall & Skye Railway

ROSS

1980s; 1990s

Highland Railway; railways; transport; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Dingwall & Skye Railway

The Dingwall and Skye Railway was opened in 1870 but only went as far as Strome Ferry on Loch Carron. It would be another twenty-seven years before the railway reached the terminus at Kyle of Lochalsh. In this audio extract, John Thomas (1914-1982), one of Britain's leading railway historians, talks about the line's summit at Luib. The recording was made on board a special excursion train to Kyle of Lochalsh in 1973.<br /> <br /> This, ladies and gentlemen, is Luib, on the summit of the line, thirty-one and three quarter miles from Dingwall. It is also the watershed of the county and now we start dropping down towards Lochcarron. The summit is 646 feet above sea level. By this time you will realise that the promoters of the line and the engineers who built it hadn't their sorrows to seek. The promoters had great difficulty in getting enough money to carry the line forward. Work was always being stopped because enough money wasn't even forthcoming to pay the wages of the navvies. The principal idea was to get as quickly as possible under the shortest and easiest route to deep water, in the west. And, of course, that meant Lochcarron. At one time they decided that they hadn't enough funds to get any further than Attadale, which was the first approach to deep water. However, a few more people bought shares and they pushed on to Strome Ferry