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TITLE
Avalanche Shelter, Dingwall & Skye Railway
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_JOHNTHOMAS_09
PLACENAME
Loch Carron
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
John Thomas
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2071
KEYWORDS
Highland Railway
railways
transport
avalanches
audio

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The Dingwall and Skye Railway was opened in 1870 but only went as far as Strome Ferry on Loch Carron. It would be another twenty-seven years before the railway reached the terminus at Kyle of Lochalsh. In this audio extract, John Thomas (1914-1982), one of Britain's leading railway historians, describes the avalanche shelter on the line, on the shores of Loch Carron, between Attadale and Ardnarff. The recording was made on board a special excursion train to Kyle of Lochalsh in 1973.

This was one of the most difficult parts of the line to construct and also operate. A great operational hazard were the stones and rocks constantly falling down the mountainside. In recent years the railway and the county, in cooperation, built an avalanche shelter which we're just about to enter. This covers both the road, which is a new road of course, and the railway, and the falling rocks go right across the shelter into the water. On the 16th of November, 1969, there was a particularly bad fall which blocked the railway until the 16th of March in the following year. This was the reason why the avalanche shelter was constructed at this very vulnerable point. You'll notice, ladies and gentlemen, that the rock is netted; there's a steel net over the rock to prevent small rocks from coming down onto the road

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Avalanche Shelter, Dingwall & Skye Railway

ROSS

1980s; 1990s

Highland Railway; railways; transport; avalanches; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Dingwall & Skye Railway

The Dingwall and Skye Railway was opened in 1870 but only went as far as Strome Ferry on Loch Carron. It would be another twenty-seven years before the railway reached the terminus at Kyle of Lochalsh. In this audio extract, John Thomas (1914-1982), one of Britain's leading railway historians, describes the avalanche shelter on the line, on the shores of Loch Carron, between Attadale and Ardnarff. The recording was made on board a special excursion train to Kyle of Lochalsh in 1973.<br /> <br /> This was one of the most difficult parts of the line to construct and also operate. A great operational hazard were the stones and rocks constantly falling down the mountainside. In recent years the railway and the county, in cooperation, built an avalanche shelter which we're just about to enter. This covers both the road, which is a new road of course, and the railway, and the falling rocks go right across the shelter into the water. On the 16th of November, 1969, there was a particularly bad fall which blocked the railway until the 16th of March in the following year. This was the reason why the avalanche shelter was constructed at this very vulnerable point. You'll notice, ladies and gentlemen, that the rock is netted; there's a steel net over the rock to prevent small rocks from coming down onto the road