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TITLE
Geology at Raven's Rock, near Garve
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_JOHNTHOMAS_17
PLACENAME
Raven's Rock, Garve
DISTRICT
Muir of Ord
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Contin
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
John Thomas
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2083
KEYWORDS
Highland Railway
railways
transport
audio

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The Dingwall and Skye Railway was opened in 1870 but only went as far as Strome Ferry on Loch Carron. It would be another twenty-seven years before the railway reached the terminus at Kyle of Lochalsh. In this audio extract, the geology around Raven's Rock, near Garve, is described. The recording was made on board a special excursion train to Kyle of Lochalsh in 1973.

Just near to Raven's Rock summit we have the junction of two rock types; to the west, and including Raven's Rock summit, we have the old metamorphosed rocks which are called by the geologists, the Moine Sequence. To the east of this line, a few mile, a few - a mile or so from Raven's Rock summit we have the outcrop of the Devonian Old Red Sandstone; the middle sequence of this particular geological succession. So the type of stone which we have at Raven's Rock summit, are complex rocks of a metamorphic type called the Moine Rocks. They've been subjected to repeated earth movements. There have been, in fact, probably four earth movements, four sequences of twisting and folding the rocks in a very complicated way. The pressures which folded the rocks have come from several directions - not always the same direction - and the oldest of these has been dated recently by radiometric dating techniques to be something in the order of 750 million years ago. These rocks originally were rocks which were sediments which were laid down in fairly deep water. At the same time, the Torridonian sandstones, which we were travelling over in the Duirinish, Drumbuie, Plockton, Strome Ferry area, they were laid down approximately the same time in much shallower water

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Geology at Raven's Rock, near Garve

ROSS: Contin

1980s; 1990s

Highland Railway; railways; transport; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Dingwall & Skye Railway

The Dingwall and Skye Railway was opened in 1870 but only went as far as Strome Ferry on Loch Carron. It would be another twenty-seven years before the railway reached the terminus at Kyle of Lochalsh. In this audio extract, the geology around Raven's Rock, near Garve, is described. The recording was made on board a special excursion train to Kyle of Lochalsh in 1973.<br /> <br /> Just near to Raven's Rock summit we have the junction of two rock types; to the west, and including Raven's Rock summit, we have the old metamorphosed rocks which are called by the geologists, the Moine Sequence. To the east of this line, a few mile, a few - a mile or so from Raven's Rock summit we have the outcrop of the Devonian Old Red Sandstone; the middle sequence of this particular geological succession. So the type of stone which we have at Raven's Rock summit, are complex rocks of a metamorphic type called the Moine Rocks. They've been subjected to repeated earth movements. There have been, in fact, probably four earth movements, four sequences of twisting and folding the rocks in a very complicated way. The pressures which folded the rocks have come from several directions - not always the same direction - and the oldest of these has been dated recently by radiometric dating techniques to be something in the order of 750 million years ago. These rocks originally were rocks which were sediments which were laid down in fairly deep water. At the same time, the Torridonian sandstones, which we were travelling over in the Duirinish, Drumbuie, Plockton, Strome Ferry area, they were laid down approximately the same time in much shallower water