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TITLE
Kylesku Ferry - the last crossing (1 of 10)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_KYLESKUFERRY_01
PLACENAME
Kylesku
DISTRICT
Eddrachillis and Durness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Eddrachillis
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Walter Brewer
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2084
KEYWORDS
ferries
car ferries
audio

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Kylesku is a small settlement in north-west Sutherland, where Loch Glencoul and Loch Glendhu join to flow through Loch a' Chairn into Eddrachillis Bay. The Kylesku narrows were crossed by a ferry from the early 1800s, until a bridge was built in 1984. In this audio extract, Bill Sinclair talks to Walter Brauer, skipper of the 'Maid of Kylesku', on his last voyage before the official opening of the bridge.

Interviewer: With me is Walter Brauer, skipper of the Maid of Kylesku. Walter, there's far more than midges here today. What, what's all happening?

Oh well, I don't know. As far as I know the Queen is come here this morning and that's the all these nice little children sitting over there and waiting till the Queen comes ashore.

Interviewer: You're running at the moment an official ferry? The bridge is at the moment closed to traffic?

Yes, we run officially till half-past-nine this morning and after that we are unemployed.

Interviewer: Is there any hope of employment for the members of the crew now?

As far as we've been told, there'll be no job for us. We're all made redundant.

Interviewer: How many is there of you now?

There's five ferrymen of us, and the five of us have to take other jobs.

Interviewer: Now, the ferry has been running for many, many years. Do you know how long there's been a ferry here? How far back can you know about?

Well, I don't know. I've heard so many stories about - Early in the eighteenth century maybe? Maybe before? I don't know. It's many, many years. There used to be old rowing boats here, and they used to take the cattle behind the rowing boats and used to go across like that. But since I came here there's been only three boats; two with turntable and one drive-on and drive-off ferry. Bit more modernised in those - in these days

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Kylesku Ferry - the last crossing (1 of 10)

SUTHERLAND: Eddrachillis

1980s; 1990s

ferries; car ferries; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Kylesku Ferry

Kylesku is a small settlement in north-west Sutherland, where Loch Glencoul and Loch Glendhu join to flow through Loch a' Chairn into Eddrachillis Bay. The Kylesku narrows were crossed by a ferry from the early 1800s, until a bridge was built in 1984. In this audio extract, Bill Sinclair talks to Walter Brauer, skipper of the 'Maid of Kylesku', on his last voyage before the official opening of the bridge.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: With me is Walter Brauer, skipper of the Maid of Kylesku. Walter, there's far more than midges here today. What, what's all happening?<br /> <br /> Oh well, I don't know. As far as I know the Queen is come here this morning and that's the all these nice little children sitting over there and waiting till the Queen comes ashore.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: You're running at the moment an official ferry? The bridge is at the moment closed to traffic?<br /> <br /> Yes, we run officially till half-past-nine this morning and after that we are unemployed. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Is there any hope of employment for the members of the crew now?<br /> <br /> As far as we've been told, there'll be no job for us. We're all made redundant.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: How many is there of you now?<br /> <br /> There's five ferrymen of us, and the five of us have to take other jobs.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now, the ferry has been running for many, many years. Do you know how long there's been a ferry here? How far back can you know about?<br /> <br /> Well, I don't know. I've heard so many stories about - Early in the eighteenth century maybe? Maybe before? I don't know. It's many, many years. There used to be old rowing boats here, and they used to take the cattle behind the rowing boats and used to go across like that. But since I came here there's been only three boats; two with turntable and one drive-on and drive-off ferry. Bit more modernised in those - in these days