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TITLE
Kylesku Ferry - the last crossing (2 of 10)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_KYLESKUFERRY_02
PLACENAME
Kylesku
DISTRICT
Eddrachillis and Durness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Eddrachillis
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Walter Brewer
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2085
KEYWORDS
ferries
car ferries
audio

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Kylesku is a small settlement in north-west Sutherland, where Loch Glencoul and Loch Glendhu join to flow through Loch a' Chairn into Eddrachillis Bay. The Kylesku narrows were crossed by a ferry from the early 1800s, until a bridge was built in 1984. In this audio extract, Bill Sinclair talks to Walter Brauer, skipper of the 'Maid of Kylesku', on his last voyage before the official opening of the bridge.

Interviewer: Now, this ferry as we - I've been coming across for many, many years and I remember the old turntable boats and some wonderful crossings - I think a little bit of the character of the place is going to change now.

I think so, yes, definitely. I mean the ferry boats made this place here. The bridge is just a dead animal really but I'll miss the ferry boats very, very much and I think my mates think exactly the same too, as I do.

Interviewer: We've got the parish of Eddrachillis on the north side of the ferry, and Assynt on the south, do you think locals are going to benefit a lot, I mean, from a social way of life?

Oh yes. There's no doubt about it. I mean, we can travel free now to the north, and the north people can go free to the south anytime, anytime - day, night. I think this is one good thing about it, the bridge, that they can commute better now. I mean, before, in the winter time, the ferry was closed at four o'clock and you couldn't go anywhere.

Interviewer: I always felt like I was going to an island when I crossed.

Well, there's many people that are telling us, you know, 'I think we have to go across to, to Iceland'. I heard people saying, you know, 'Is this Iceland on the other side?' So, we get good laughs on the ferry here

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Kylesku Ferry - the last crossing (2 of 10)

SUTHERLAND: Eddrachillis

1980s; 1990s

ferries; car ferries; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Kylesku Ferry

Kylesku is a small settlement in north-west Sutherland, where Loch Glencoul and Loch Glendhu join to flow through Loch a' Chairn into Eddrachillis Bay. The Kylesku narrows were crossed by a ferry from the early 1800s, until a bridge was built in 1984. In this audio extract, Bill Sinclair talks to Walter Brauer, skipper of the 'Maid of Kylesku', on his last voyage before the official opening of the bridge.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now, this ferry as we - I've been coming across for many, many years and I remember the old turntable boats and some wonderful crossings - I think a little bit of the character of the place is going to change now.<br /> <br /> I think so, yes, definitely. I mean the ferry boats made this place here. The bridge is just a dead animal really but I'll miss the ferry boats very, very much and I think my mates think exactly the same too, as I do.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: We've got the parish of Eddrachillis on the north side of the ferry, and Assynt on the south, do you think locals are going to benefit a lot, I mean, from a social way of life?<br /> <br /> Oh yes. There's no doubt about it. I mean, we can travel free now to the north, and the north people can go free to the south anytime, anytime - day, night. I think this is one good thing about it, the bridge, that they can commute better now. I mean, before, in the winter time, the ferry was closed at four o'clock and you couldn't go anywhere.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I always felt like I was going to an island when I crossed.<br /> <br /> Well, there's many people that are telling us, you know, 'I think we have to go across to, to Iceland'. I heard people saying, you know, 'Is this Iceland on the other side?' So, we get good laughs on the ferry here