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TITLE
Inverness Military Tattoo
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_LEWISNAIRN
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Lewis Nairn
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2103
KEYWORDS
competitions
pipe bands
audio

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Although not as large as the renowned Edinburgh Tattoo, the annual Inverness Military Tattoo has attracted spectators from all over the world since the early 1950s. In this audio extract from 1979, Bill Sinclair interviews Lewis Nairn, producer and commentator of the tattoo at that time.

Interviewer: How many years now, Lewis, has the tattoo been running?

The tattoo has been going since during the war, when it was started off with the cadet units in town doing what they 'Combined Operations' and did a one night show, in the park here, twenty-seven years ago.

Interviewer: What's the band we're hearing just now?

The band at the moment is the massed pipes and drums of the RAF Kinloss and the Royal British Legion Scotland, Inverness branch.

Interviewer: How many cadet services are taking part?

Four. We've got the Sea Cadet Corps, the First Battalion Queens Own Highlanders Army Cadet Force, the 161 First Highland Air Training Corps, and the ladies, of course, the Scottish Girls Training Corps. The girls will be doing country dancing; army cadets will be re-enacting a First World War battle with lots of smoke and bangs and, well, fairly authentic uniforms; ATC are doing an active, slightly comic skit about retaining, regaining instruments from a crashed aircraft, so they've made a - gone to a lot of trouble to make a cardboard replica; and at the moment, in front of us, the Sea Cadet Corps are setting up their shearlegs. Quite a complicated little thing, a big thing, rather. They get these two great triangular things up -

Interviewer: I see.

- all sorts of ropes all over the place. As you can see, boys running with pipes and ropes and boxes and what have you, and within an astonishingly short space of time they have that all set up, they're wheeching these loads over this supposed chasm in the middle and getting them back again and actually putting a volunteer over. Funny how the volunteer always seems to be the smallest boy.

Interviewer: The smallest boy. Is this perhaps to help them to - if they ever get into the navy or the - to help to go from one ship to the other at sea? Is it the same id- something like that?

Something the same idea. It's training.

Interviewer: Yes.

It's getting the boys to work together, just like the navy do the field gun race - well that's nothing to do with running ships - but it's tremendous teamwork training. And this is what the cadet units are all about is to develop the qualities of good citizenship

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Inverness Military Tattoo

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1980s; 1990s

competitions; pipe bands; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Miscellaneous

Although not as large as the renowned Edinburgh Tattoo, the annual Inverness Military Tattoo has attracted spectators from all over the world since the early 1950s. In this audio extract from 1979, Bill Sinclair interviews Lewis Nairn, producer and commentator of the tattoo at that time.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: How many years now, Lewis, has the tattoo been running?<br /> <br /> The tattoo has been going since during the war, when it was started off with the cadet units in town doing what they 'Combined Operations' and did a one night show, in the park here, twenty-seven years ago. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: What's the band we're hearing just now?<br /> <br /> The band at the moment is the massed pipes and drums of the RAF Kinloss and the Royal British Legion Scotland, Inverness branch. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: How many cadet services are taking part?<br /> <br /> Four. We've got the Sea Cadet Corps, the First Battalion Queens Own Highlanders Army Cadet Force, the 161 First Highland Air Training Corps, and the ladies, of course, the Scottish Girls Training Corps. The girls will be doing country dancing; army cadets will be re-enacting a First World War battle with lots of smoke and bangs and, well, fairly authentic uniforms; ATC are doing an active, slightly comic skit about retaining, regaining instruments from a crashed aircraft, so they've made a - gone to a lot of trouble to make a cardboard replica; and at the moment, in front of us, the Sea Cadet Corps are setting up their shearlegs. Quite a complicated little thing, a big thing, rather. They get these two great triangular things up -<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I see. <br /> <br /> - all sorts of ropes all over the place. As you can see, boys running with pipes and ropes and boxes and what have you, and within an astonishingly short space of time they have that all set up, they're wheeching these loads over this supposed chasm in the middle and getting them back again and actually putting a volunteer over. Funny how the volunteer always seems to be the smallest boy.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: The smallest boy. Is this perhaps to help them to - if they ever get into the navy or the - to help to go from one ship to the other at sea? Is it the same id- something like that?<br /> <br /> Something the same idea. It's training.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> It's getting the boys to work together, just like the navy do the field gun race - well that's nothing to do with running ships - but it's tremendous teamwork training. And this is what the cadet units are all about is to develop the qualities of good citizenship