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TITLE
Insect Life on Loch Flemington
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_LOCHFLEMINGTON
PLACENAME
Gollanfield
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Petty
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2105
KEYWORDS
insects
entomology
audio

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Loch Flemington near Gollanfield, on the road between Inverness and Nairn, is designated a SSSI (Site of Special Scientific Interest) based on its importance as breeding site for Slavonian grebes. In this audio extract from the 1980s, Bill Sinclair discusses the varied insect life of the loch with a fellow naturalist.

These little bl-, dark, almost looks like specks of pepper, in the water -

Interviewer: Yes

- if you watch they do in fact move -

Interviewer: They certainly do.

- and these are the minute crustaceans that make up the loch plankton. There are other insects here, too. You'll see that there are these oval-shaped, flattish, oval-shaped creatures, swimming about, using their legs as oars. The majority of them are about a quarter of an inch long -

Interviewer: Mm-hmmm.

- with a brownish, upper surface and at least one there look, has got a pair of red eyes. These are bugs. Aquatic bugs.

Interviewer: Sort of like mini beetles aren't they?

They are like beetles but they're not beetles. These are bugs. They do not have the complete metamorphic cycle that we associate with the true beetles. In other words, we have the egg, the larvae, and then the adult form. And these are the water boatmen. This is the lesser water boatman, and it feeds on the algae that grows on the loch's, loch bottom, on the pebbles, and the vegetation of the loch. And there's a nuch - a much bigger insect -

Interviewer: Oh, yes.

- and this is the big, bigger, big brother, if you like.

Interviewer: Of the other one.

Yes. This is the large water boatman or back swimmer. It's - again oval in shape, looking at it from above, and you can see that the hind pair of the three pairs of legs are much elongated and are feathered; have minute bristles attached to them, growing form them.

Interviewer: What, why, what is this for?

Well these, of course, are acting as oars. And the interesting thing is, of course, it's swimming upside down. We are seeing the ventral surface, and the back itself forms the keel -

Interviewer: I see.

- of this submarine. And also, if we, in fact, inverted this tray so that the light came from below -

Interviewer: From below, yes.

- instead of from the bright sun above, you'd find that the back swimmer would in fact turn over and swim, if you like, the correct way up.

Interviewer: So gravity has nothing to do with it?

It's not gravity. It's nothing to do with it. It's caused by the direction of the light

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Insect Life on Loch Flemington

INVERNESS: Petty

1980s

insects; entomology; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Miscellaneous

Loch Flemington near Gollanfield, on the road between Inverness and Nairn, is designated a SSSI (Site of Special Scientific Interest) based on its importance as breeding site for Slavonian grebes. In this audio extract from the 1980s, Bill Sinclair discusses the varied insect life of the loch with a fellow naturalist. <br /> <br /> These little bl-, dark, almost looks like specks of pepper, in the water -<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes<br /> <br /> - if you watch they do in fact move - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: They certainly do.<br /> <br /> - and these are the minute crustaceans that make up the loch plankton. There are other insects here, too. You'll see that there are these oval-shaped, flattish, oval-shaped creatures, swimming about, using their legs as oars. The majority of them are about a quarter of an inch long -<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Mm-hmmm.<br /> <br /> - with a brownish, upper surface and at least one there look, has got a pair of red eyes. These are bugs. Aquatic bugs. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Sort of like mini beetles aren't they?<br /> <br /> They are like beetles but they're not beetles. These are bugs. They do not have the complete metamorphic cycle that we associate with the true beetles. In other words, we have the egg, the larvae, and then the adult form. And these are the water boatmen. This is the lesser water boatman, and it feeds on the algae that grows on the loch's, loch bottom, on the pebbles, and the vegetation of the loch. And there's a nuch - a much bigger insect - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Oh, yes.<br /> <br /> - and this is the big, bigger, big brother, if you like. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Of the other one.<br /> <br /> Yes. This is the large water boatman or back swimmer. It's - again oval in shape, looking at it from above, and you can see that the hind pair of the three pairs of legs are much elongated and are feathered; have minute bristles attached to them, growing form them.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What, why, what is this for?<br /> <br /> Well these, of course, are acting as oars. And the interesting thing is, of course, it's swimming upside down. We are seeing the ventral surface, and the back itself forms the keel - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: I see.<br /> <br /> - of this submarine. And also, if we, in fact, inverted this tray so that the light came from below - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: From below, yes.<br /> <br /> - instead of from the bright sun above, you'd find that the back swimmer would in fact turn over and swim, if you like, the correct way up.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: So gravity has nothing to do with it?<br /> <br /> It's not gravity. It's nothing to do with it. It's caused by the direction of the light