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TITLE
Hugh Miller's Cottage (2 of 3)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_MARYFYFE_02
PLACENAME
Cromarty
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Cromarty
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Mary Fyfe
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2108
KEYWORDS
cottages
geologist
geologists
audio

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Hugh Miller was born in Cromarty in 1802. A stonemason to trade, he went on to become a prolific writer and journalist, combining his religious beliefs with a passion for geology and folklore. His cottage, dating to 1711, is now a museum owned by the National Trust for Scotland. In this audio extract, Bill Sinclair finds out more about Miller's cottage from Mary Fyfe.

Interviewer: Now, here's a most interesting chair. How would you describe this one, Mary?

Well, this is known as a bible chair and it's a very basic looking thing, but it's got a drawer underneath it and they would keep the bible in the drawer because, of curse, the bible was read every day and they would, in fact, learn perhaps sometimes even to read from the bible.

Interviewer: And there's an interesting shelf here, on this side of the arm.

Yes, it drops down and it was used, of course, for resting the bible on because the bible in those days was always big and heavy.

Interviewer: The fireplace has been very well restored and you've got all the different utensils that you would have used in the kitchen. Would you like to tell me what, what we have here?

Well, in the fireplace here we have peat but they would use a lot of driftwood, of course, being, Cromarty being on the coast. And they would do all their cooking from the swing here. They would hook their pots and kettles onto the hooks. And above the fireplace we have what is known as a wedding stone, or marriage stone, and here we have the initials 'John Feddes' married 'Jean Galley' and they built their cottage in 1711. So this is all marked on the stone and, as I say, is known as the wedding stone. These are Hugh Miller's great-grandparents; it's always been the Miller family home

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Hugh Miller's Cottage (2 of 3)

ROSS: Cromarty

1980s; 1990s

cottages; geologist; geologists; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Hugh Miller

Hugh Miller was born in Cromarty in 1802. A stonemason to trade, he went on to become a prolific writer and journalist, combining his religious beliefs with a passion for geology and folklore. His cottage, dating to 1711, is now a museum owned by the National Trust for Scotland. In this audio extract, Bill Sinclair finds out more about Miller's cottage from Mary Fyfe. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now, here's a most interesting chair. How would you describe this one, Mary?<br /> <br /> Well, this is known as a bible chair and it's a very basic looking thing, but it's got a drawer underneath it and they would keep the bible in the drawer because, of curse, the bible was read every day and they would, in fact, learn perhaps sometimes even to read from the bible.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And there's an interesting shelf here, on this side of the arm.<br /> <br /> Yes, it drops down and it was used, of course, for resting the bible on because the bible in those days was always big and heavy.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: The fireplace has been very well restored and you've got all the different utensils that you would have used in the kitchen. Would you like to tell me what, what we have here?<br /> <br /> Well, in the fireplace here we have peat but they would use a lot of driftwood, of course, being, Cromarty being on the coast. And they would do all their cooking from the swing here. They would hook their pots and kettles onto the hooks. And above the fireplace we have what is known as a wedding stone, or marriage stone, and here we have the initials 'John Feddes' married 'Jean Galley' and they built their cottage in 1711. So this is all marked on the stone and, as I say, is known as the wedding stone. These are Hugh Miller's great-grandparents; it's always been the Miller family home