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TITLE
Hugh Miller's Cottage (3 of 3)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_MARYFYFE_03
PLACENAME
Cromarty
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Cromarty
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Mary Fyfe
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2109
KEYWORDS
cottages
geologist
geologists
audio

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Hugh Miller was born in Cromarty in 1802. A stonemason to trade, he went on to become a prolific writer and journalist, combining his religious beliefs with a passion for geology and folklore. His cottage, dating to 1711, is now a museum owned by the National Trust for Scotland. In this audio extract, Bill Sinclair finds out more about Miller's cottage from Mary Fyfe.

Interviewer: There's a - what to me looks like a - a chest of drawers or a writing bureau. Does the bureau front fold down?

No. This is something that confuses most people.

Interviewer: It lifts up!

That's right and it's a meal girnel, a very posh one. And they have the top two drawers are false and inside you have two places; one for the meal, for the porridge, and the other, flour, for the baking. And so you have the two false drawers, and the one underneath is for the porridge.

Interviewer: And they actually work, the drawers underneath?

Yes, they would put the porridge in the drawer; it would dry out hard like a cake and they would just cut off a piece when they wanted it and take it to the fishing and the fields.

Interviewer: What else would you like to show me?

Well, this is a lovely chest here - a kist - and it was made in 1714. When you think of it, well before the days of Bonnie Prince Charlie. And they would keep their Sunday clothes and anything nice like that into - in the chest because there were no wardrobes and cupboards in those days. Everything was kept in boxes. For example, even the tea. This, we have - Indian tea would be kept in this little, this side, the China tea here, and a beautifully engraved little crystal bowl in the middle, where they would blend the tea

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Hugh Miller's Cottage (3 of 3)

ROSS: Cromarty

1980s; 1990s

cottages; geologist; geologists; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Hugh Miller

Hugh Miller was born in Cromarty in 1802. A stonemason to trade, he went on to become a prolific writer and journalist, combining his religious beliefs with a passion for geology and folklore. His cottage, dating to 1711, is now a museum owned by the National Trust for Scotland. In this audio extract, Bill Sinclair finds out more about Miller's cottage from Mary Fyfe. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: There's a - what to me looks like a - a chest of drawers or a writing bureau. Does the bureau front fold down?<br /> <br /> No. This is something that confuses most people.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: It lifts up!<br /> <br /> That's right and it's a meal girnel, a very posh one. And they have the top two drawers are false and inside you have two places; one for the meal, for the porridge, and the other, flour, for the baking. And so you have the two false drawers, and the one underneath is for the porridge.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And they actually work, the drawers underneath?<br /> <br /> Yes, they would put the porridge in the drawer; it would dry out hard like a cake and they would just cut off a piece when they wanted it and take it to the fishing and the fields.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What else would you like to show me?<br /> <br /> Well, this is a lovely chest here - a kist - and it was made in 1714. When you think of it, well before the days of Bonnie Prince Charlie. And they would keep their Sunday clothes and anything nice like that into - in the chest because there were no wardrobes and cupboards in those days. Everything was kept in boxes. For example, even the tea. This, we have - Indian tea would be kept in this little, this side, the China tea here, and a beautifully engraved little crystal bowl in the middle, where they would blend the tea