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TITLE
Inverness Memories - baking on the girdle
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_MRSROLLO_01
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
Mrs Rollo
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2112
KEYWORDS
domestic
housewife
housework
food
home baking
audio

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In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with a Mrs. Sneddon. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers cooking over the fire.

The photograph is of Mrs Rosie Rollo, her husband John (in his army uniform), and one of the couple's children. It was taken around 1918.

Well, Ah did all the cookin on a gas ring. We had the hot - runnin water, but no hot water. It was all heated by either pans or by a kettle, but we did all the cooking. An I'd no gas oven, just an ordinary oven. An then we'd - pots o soup would simmer on the hob an then Ah put a frame over the fire for the girdle, an Ah made scones, potato scones, soda scones, pancakes, and oatcakes.

Interviewer: An it's just coal an sticks ye burn, doon here?

Coal an sticks, oh yes. Uh-huh. Coal an sticks, yes.

Interviewer: Did ye ever use peat or - ?

Not except in New Year time - it gives them a nice aroma when they're -

Interviewer: Aye.

Corresponds wi the whisky! [Laughter]

Interviewer: Whit aboot fir cones?

Oh well, we'd - when we'd round the Longman that's what the children did when they were - we went there - that's, we passed the holidays, an we took a bogie. Made lemonade drinks an tea. We had a kettle that we boiled water on it, down the Longman, we'd go dow-, light a fire then ye see, they werna this petrol racket in it. An we lit an open fire just on the top o the sand, an we would boil a kettle there an have 'tinkers' tea', as the bairns called it. So then - an then when the tide went out they went an gathered wilks. We took then home an then we cleaned them, an we boiled them in a pan so they had them an they would have a needle or a thread to take them out - a needle - pin, to pick the wilks out when they came, an they enjoyed it but I didn't. Ooh no. [Laughter]. An then they would -

Interviewer: Ye would gather the fir cones then and take them home too?

Aye, or any bits o driftwood. Plenty firewood down there. Ye know, it was washed in wi the tide? Ye'd get plenty kindlings an that's what we - any time we got that. An any time I was out a wauk if we seen a bit coal or a bit, say, 'Oh Granny this an Granny that, look'. Oh man. We'd never come home empty, we'd always tae have a spare bag tae get pick up anything. An then ye see in the harbour, they got the coal boats in then a lot, an they were droppin bits o coal on the road an we could pick it up there ye see? An the same when the fish boats came in. We'd get our fish there an our herring - Kessock herring

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Inverness Memories - baking on the girdle

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1970s

domestic; housewife; housework; food; home baking; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Inverness Recollections

In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with a Mrs. Sneddon. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers cooking over the fire. <br /> <br /> The photograph is of Mrs Rosie Rollo, her husband John (in his army uniform), and one of the couple's children. It was taken around 1918.<br /> <br /> Well, Ah did all the cookin on a gas ring. We had the hot - runnin water, but no hot water. It was all heated by either pans or by a kettle, but we did all the cooking. An I'd no gas oven, just an ordinary oven. An then we'd - pots o soup would simmer on the hob an then Ah put a frame over the fire for the girdle, an Ah made scones, potato scones, soda scones, pancakes, and oatcakes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: An it's just coal an sticks ye burn, doon here?<br /> <br /> Coal an sticks, oh yes. Uh-huh. Coal an sticks, yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did ye ever use peat or - ?<br /> <br /> Not except in New Year time - it gives them a nice aroma when they're - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Aye.<br /> <br /> Corresponds wi the whisky! [Laughter]<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Whit aboot fir cones?<br /> <br /> Oh well, we'd - when we'd round the Longman that's what the children did when they were - we went there - that's, we passed the holidays, an we took a bogie. Made lemonade drinks an tea. We had a kettle that we boiled water on it, down the Longman, we'd go dow-, light a fire then ye see, they werna this petrol racket in it. An we lit an open fire just on the top o the sand, an we would boil a kettle there an have 'tinkers' tea', as the bairns called it. So then - an then when the tide went out they went an gathered wilks. We took then home an then we cleaned them, an we boiled them in a pan so they had them an they would have a needle or a thread to take them out - a needle - pin, to pick the wilks out when they came, an they enjoyed it but I didn't. Ooh no. [Laughter]. An then they would - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Ye would gather the fir cones then and take them home too?<br /> <br /> Aye, or any bits o driftwood. Plenty firewood down there. Ye know, it was washed in wi the tide? Ye'd get plenty kindlings an that's what we - any time we got that. An any time I was out a wauk if we seen a bit coal or a bit, say, 'Oh Granny this an Granny that, look'. Oh man. We'd never come home empty, we'd always tae have a spare bag tae get pick up anything. An then ye see in the harbour, they got the coal boats in then a lot, an they were droppin bits o coal on the road an we could pick it up there ye see? An the same when the fish boats came in. We'd get our fish there an our herring - Kessock herring