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TITLE
Inverness Memories - buying fish and milk
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_MRSROLLO_02
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
Mrs Rollo
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2113
KEYWORDS
domestic
housewife
housework
shopping
food
audio

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In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with a Mrs. Sneddon. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers buying fish and milk.

The photograph is of Friars Street with the steeple of the Old High Church in the background.

Interviewer: Did ye ever have the fishwives coming round the doors?

No, a man from Avoch came.

Interviewer: Aye.

Some, some would come with a barrow an others would come wi a hurlie. But Mr. Macleman always had the hurlie and he's parked it down in a street, in a yard, down there, the stables, and he got to park it in there. An then he would give a shout in the morning, what was Ah wanting? So, Ah would tell him an he'd, if he had time, he would wait on a cup o cocoa, an he says 'No, Ah'll get it when Ah come back.' So when he would go back if he'd any over I would get it to make stuff for the bairns - boil the fish - scraps an that - make fish patties an that for them.

Interviewer: An did he give ye the fish scraps for nothing?

Oh yes, aye.

Interviewer: An the fish, was it cheaper getting it off those boats?

Oh yes, I would get a whole, whole coddie for half a crown. Uh-huh. Oh yes, we wis well off for fish.

Interviewer: Aye.

An for the - was it a shuffler noo? Or a skillet or something? It was Kessock we used to get, for a few pence.

Interviewer: How, how much would be in that?

Och, about twenty-four, if no more. With the price of them now -

Interviewer: Would that be fae the fish boats or?

Well, if they went to the harbour they would get it. And then there was the potatoes. They used to go round in - wi a cart wi that. We used to get, och, it was scoops they used, it wisna - they didn't weigh them then. An then we got the milk round and we'd to go wi a flagon. An they would get skimmed milk for tuppence, or so much a pint, penny or tuppence a pint.

Interviewer: Would this be for yer porridge in the morning?

Well no, it was more for makin rice puddings. But we would get the ordinary milk - I think it was only tuppence a pint - but we used to get the skimmed milk cheaper

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Inverness Memories - buying fish and milk

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1970s

domestic; housewife; housework; shopping; food; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Inverness Recollections

In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with a Mrs. Sneddon. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers buying fish and milk. <br /> <br /> The photograph is of Friars Street with the steeple of the Old High Church in the background.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did ye ever have the fishwives coming round the doors?<br /> <br /> No, a man from Avoch came.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Aye.<br /> <br /> Some, some would come with a barrow an others would come wi a hurlie. But Mr. Macleman always had the hurlie and he's parked it down in a street, in a yard, down there, the stables, and he got to park it in there. An then he would give a shout in the morning, what was Ah wanting? So, Ah would tell him an he'd, if he had time, he would wait on a cup o cocoa, an he says 'No, Ah'll get it when Ah come back.' So when he would go back if he'd any over I would get it to make stuff for the bairns - boil the fish - scraps an that - make fish patties an that for them.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: An did he give ye the fish scraps for nothing?<br /> <br /> Oh yes, aye.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: An the fish, was it cheaper getting it off those boats?<br /> <br /> Oh yes, I would get a whole, whole coddie for half a crown. Uh-huh. Oh yes, we wis well off for fish. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Aye.<br /> <br /> An for the - was it a shuffler noo? Or a skillet or something? It was Kessock we used to get, for a few pence.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: How, how much would be in that?<br /> <br /> Och, about twenty-four, if no more. With the price of them now - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Would that be fae the fish boats or?<br /> <br /> Well, if they went to the harbour they would get it. And then there was the potatoes. They used to go round in - wi a cart wi that. We used to get, och, it was scoops they used, it wisna - they didn't weigh them then. An then we got the milk round and we'd to go wi a flagon. An they would get skimmed milk for tuppence, or so much a pint, penny or tuppence a pint.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Would this be for yer porridge in the morning?<br /> <br /> Well no, it was more for makin rice puddings. But we would get the ordinary milk - I think it was only tuppence a pint - but we used to get the skimmed milk cheaper