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TITLE
Inverness Memories - cooking on the range
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_MRSROLLO_03
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
Mrs Rollo
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2114
KEYWORDS
domestic
housewife
housework
food
audio

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In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with a Mrs. Sneddon. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers cooking and baking on the range.

The photograph is of Friars Street with the steeple of the Old High Church in the background.

Interviewer: D'ye make porridge in the mornings?

Ah well some of the family like brose and others like porridge and one of the boys was fond of pease brose.

Interviewer: How d'ye make it?

Oh, just powder. So much - Well, if it was only a small bowl it'd be about two tablespoons, pinch of salt, an sugar if they wanted sugar an just add boiling water an stir it till it's thick an then take it wi milk.

Interviewer: Did ye ever make skirlie an -?

Skirlie? Oh aye. Was hard up in them days.

Interviewer: That was a sort o cheap meal?

Yes, yes. Oatmeal an that wis jist fat fried, an then sprinkled oatmeal an onion an pepper an salt in it. But it was very dry - they didna care much for it.

Interviewer: Ye did all yer cookin on the range? On the range - ye did most of yer cooking?

Oh yes, yes, yes. Uh-huh. Oh I never had a cooker. No. An then we used to make dough balls, dough - dough rings, wi fat, ye know, boiling fat an dropped that in an, then when they were ready they'd be all waiting wi the sugar to -

Interviewer: To dip them in?

- dip them in the sugar.

Interviewer: Tell me about yer mum and when you used the feathers? Tell me how ye used them?

Well, when she was baking, the flower that would be left - she would sprinkle flour on to keep it from sticking an then she would take the feathers an shake the old flour off an then every batch that would come off. If she cut the scone in four she would lift that off an put em aside an then when she put the next lot on she would take the feathers an shake the flour off and put on fresh flour again otherwise they would be burnt because the - wi the heat of the fire, ye see, it would burn all the flour or the oatmeal whatever she'd made, made wi

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Inverness Memories - cooking on the range

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1970s

domestic; housewife; housework; food; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Inverness Recollections

In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with a Mrs. Sneddon. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers cooking and baking on the range. <br /> <br /> The photograph is of Friars Street with the steeple of the Old High Church in the background.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: D'ye make porridge in the mornings?<br /> <br /> Ah well some of the family like brose and others like porridge and one of the boys was fond of pease brose. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: How d'ye make it?<br /> <br /> Oh, just powder. So much - Well, if it was only a small bowl it'd be about two tablespoons, pinch of salt, an sugar if they wanted sugar an just add boiling water an stir it till it's thick an then take it wi milk.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did ye ever make skirlie an -?<br /> <br /> Skirlie? Oh aye. Was hard up in them days.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: That was a sort o cheap meal?<br /> <br /> Yes, yes. Oatmeal an that wis jist fat fried, an then sprinkled oatmeal an onion an pepper an salt in it. But it was very dry - they didna care much for it.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Ye did all yer cookin on the range? On the range - ye did most of yer cooking?<br /> <br /> Oh yes, yes, yes. Uh-huh. Oh I never had a cooker. No. An then we used to make dough balls, dough - dough rings, wi fat, ye know, boiling fat an dropped that in an, then when they were ready they'd be all waiting wi the sugar to - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: To dip them in?<br /> <br /> - dip them in the sugar.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Tell me about yer mum and when you used the feathers? Tell me how ye used them?<br /> <br /> Well, when she was baking, the flower that would be left - she would sprinkle flour on to keep it from sticking an then she would take the feathers an shake the old flour off an then every batch that would come off. If she cut the scone in four she would lift that off an put em aside an then when she put the next lot on she would take the feathers an shake the flour off and put on fresh flour again otherwise they would be burnt because the - wi the heat of the fire, ye see, it would burn all the flour or the oatmeal whatever she'd made, made wi