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TITLE
Inverness Memories - wash day
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_MRSROLLO_05
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
Mrs Rollo
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2117
KEYWORDS
domestic
housewife
housework
laundry
audio

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In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with a Mrs. Sneddon. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers wash day.

The photograph is of Friars Street with the steeple of the Old High Church in the background.

Interviewer: When it comes to washing?

Washing, well, we just heated a - pans. Ah'd a big pan that Ah used for boiling water, an used that - heated that up, an put it in a bath, an just worked it that way. Heated up the pan til Ah was finished o the washing.

Interviewer: An did ye have two b- Ye know, a bath for rinsing, a bath for washing?

We'd a bath for, for - make a lather first. We, well it's not fancy powders ye have nowadays, it was soft soap an - or A1 powder that was the only thing that was in it then - an we just made a lather first, wi the water, an then once ye've got it at the right heat we could just put in so many things at a time. It was - if it was flannels, we'd to do that special. If it was whites we kept that aside. An we did our towels separate, oor dishtowels separate, not everything all mixie-moxie like they do now, wi no washing machine. An then we just took them out o the lather an then we rinsed them, two or three waters, an when they were ready we just wrung them out an hung them up to dry. An when they were dry -

Interviewer: An ye just wrung them by hand?

Oh yes, nothing else but hand.

Interviewer: How did you manage sheets an blankets? How did you manage them by hand?

Well we'd - perhaps someone would give ye a hand wan way an the other an ye'd twist it round.

Interviewer: An if ye'd nobody to help you were ye winding it up yer arm?

Oh, yes, yes. Make a serpent round an round yer arm. 'Make a serpent, mammie' they used to say.

Interviewer: Uh-huh. An then ye didnae have the mangle in the 1920s?

No, that was later. Later on we got that.

Interviewer: Where did ye get it? Did ye buy it or - ?

No. Mrs Fraser - Ah told ye already, didn't Ah?

Interviewer: Oh, the lady who you got the clothes horse?

No, not that one. A neighbour down the street. They used to have a cabbie ho-, cabbie, a cab. They'd horses.

Interviewer: Did they?

An they kept hens an they'd a stable for the horse. An she had this mangle, an she wasn't using it an she said the children was spoiling it. So she said to me would I like it, that Ah could have it for ten shillings. So, I thought Ah was lucky.

Interviewer: Uh-huh.

An Ah've had all this, that years an there's been many a something wrung on it, Ah'm telling ye.

Interviewer: I'll bet. When I saw ye doing the sheets, I can't remember whether, after ye'd rinsed them and ye - what did ye do, after that?

Well, Ah swung it round an then took all the, the, the twirls out it, kept it flat, an then folded it an gied it a slap an then -

Interviewer: That's just to get the creases out, you slap it?

Yes. An the bairns would say, [Slapping noises] 'Oh mummy.' It used to frighten them. [Laughter]

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Inverness Memories - wash day

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1970s

domestic; housewife; housework; laundry; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Inverness Recollections

In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with a Mrs. Sneddon. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers wash day. <br /> <br /> The photograph is of Friars Street with the steeple of the Old High Church in the background.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: When it comes to washing?<br /> <br /> Washing, well, we just heated a - pans. Ah'd a big pan that Ah used for boiling water, an used that - heated that up, an put it in a bath, an just worked it that way. Heated up the pan til Ah was finished o the washing.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: An did ye have two b- Ye know, a bath for rinsing, a bath for washing?<br /> <br /> We'd a bath for, for - make a lather first. We, well it's not fancy powders ye have nowadays, it was soft soap an - or A1 powder that was the only thing that was in it then - an we just made a lather first, wi the water, an then once ye've got it at the right heat we could just put in so many things at a time. It was - if it was flannels, we'd to do that special. If it was whites we kept that aside. An we did our towels separate, oor dishtowels separate, not everything all mixie-moxie like they do now, wi no washing machine. An then we just took them out o the lather an then we rinsed them, two or three waters, an when they were ready we just wrung them out an hung them up to dry. An when they were dry -<br /> <br /> Interviewer: An ye just wrung them by hand?<br /> <br /> Oh yes, nothing else but hand.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: How did you manage sheets an blankets? How did you manage them by hand?<br /> <br /> Well we'd - perhaps someone would give ye a hand wan way an the other an ye'd twist it round.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: An if ye'd nobody to help you were ye winding it up yer arm?<br /> <br /> Oh, yes, yes. Make a serpent round an round yer arm. 'Make a serpent, mammie' they used to say. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Uh-huh. An then ye didnae have the mangle in the 1920s?<br /> <br /> No, that was later. Later on we got that. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Where did ye get it? Did ye buy it or - ?<br /> <br /> No. Mrs Fraser - Ah told ye already, didn't Ah? <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Oh, the lady who you got the clothes horse?<br /> <br /> No, not that one. A neighbour down the street. They used to have a cabbie ho-, cabbie, a cab. They'd horses. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did they?<br /> <br /> An they kept hens an they'd a stable for the horse. An she had this mangle, an she wasn't using it an she said the children was spoiling it. So she said to me would I like it, that Ah could have it for ten shillings. So, I thought Ah was lucky.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Uh-huh.<br /> <br /> An Ah've had all this, that years an there's been many a something wrung on it, Ah'm telling ye. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: I'll bet. When I saw ye doing the sheets, I can't remember whether, after ye'd rinsed them and ye - what did ye do, after that?<br /> <br /> Well, Ah swung it round an then took all the, the, the twirls out it, kept it flat, an then folded it an gied it a slap an then - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: That's just to get the creases out, you slap it? <br /> <br /> Yes. An the bairns would say, [Slapping noises] 'Oh mummy.' It used to frighten them. [Laughter]