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TITLE
Inverness Memories - the baker's van
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_MRSROLLO_09
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
Mrs Rollo
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2123
KEYWORDS
domestic
housewife
housework
bakery
audio

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In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with a Mrs. Sneddon. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers the baker's van.

The photograph is of Friars Street with the steeple of the Old High Church in the background.

Interviewer: Did they have a lot of mobile vans? I mean, not so much - well it would have been sort of horse-drawn vans, would it?

Yes, horse-drawn, he came - the bakers - they came round to the door two or three times a week wi bread an rolls an stuff. But then, ye see, we baked our own, we didn't need to do that.

Interviewer: Did ye make yer own bread?

Not our own bread but we kept ourselves in buns, scones. We hardly ever bought buns an that. It was always scones or pancakes or something like that. They were all brought up on plain food. Take it or leave it.

Interviewer: Did you get different kinds o loaves in those days?

Yes, ye would get Vienna, an bran loaves, an plain bread, an pan bread, currant bread, spiced loaf, spiced currant, an plain currant.

Interviewer: Loaf quite cheap then?

[Sighing]. I should've kept some of the bills. Ah think it was only about fourpence or something we paid for a loaf then. An sometimes we'd get the outside ones a bitty cheaper.

Interviewer: Why?

Cos they were outside crusts on them an, a skin on them or what - I don't know what you would call it nowadays

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Inverness Memories - the baker's van

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1970s

domestic; housewife; housework; bakery; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Inverness Recollections

In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with a Mrs. Sneddon. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers the baker's van. <br /> <br /> The photograph is of Friars Street with the steeple of the Old High Church in the background.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did they have a lot of mobile vans? I mean, not so much - well it would have been sort of horse-drawn vans, would it?<br /> <br /> Yes, horse-drawn, he came - the bakers - they came round to the door two or three times a week wi bread an rolls an stuff. But then, ye see, we baked our own, we didn't need to do that.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did ye make yer own bread?<br /> <br /> Not our own bread but we kept ourselves in buns, scones. We hardly ever bought buns an that. It was always scones or pancakes or something like that. They were all brought up on plain food. Take it or leave it.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you get different kinds o loaves in those days?<br /> <br /> Yes, ye would get Vienna, an bran loaves, an plain bread, an pan bread, currant bread, spiced loaf, spiced currant, an plain currant.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Loaf quite cheap then?<br /> <br /> [Sighing]. I should've kept some of the bills. Ah think it was only about fourpence or something we paid for a loaf then. An sometimes we'd get the outside ones a bitty cheaper.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Why?<br /> <br /> Cos they were outside crusts on them an, a skin on them or what - I don't know what you would call it nowadays