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TITLE
Inverness Memories - buying provisions
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_MRSROLLO_17
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
Mrs Rollo
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2134
KEYWORDS
grocers
cooperative societies
cooperative society
audio

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In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with a Mrs. Sneddon. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers how her husband preferred the local grocer to the Co-op.

The photograph is of Friars Street with the steeple of the Old High Church in the background.

Interviewer: Was yer husband very interested in politics or anything, or?

Oh, a great labour man.

Interviewer: Was he?

Oh aye, labour, labour. An he didna like the Co-op.

Interviewer: Did he not?

No, he didna like the Co-op at all. It's always Mr. Anderson in Academy Street. The railwaymens were great, near all they went the Co-op, ye know? No him, he always backed up Anderson. He'd tell them that's how they were all so miserable, the Co-op ones. [Laughter].

Interviewer: Course, I mean, there was no Social Security or anything to help you in those days?

Oh there were nothing. We would get nothing.

There was only the soupy dinners, wasn't there? But not for us, but for the poor, poor ones.

Oh, in the olden times, aye. Ah used to hear yer father saying that they would get a bowl of porridge for a penny. An he used to go - he said that there was many a time he was sent to Johnny Macbain's for his granny's half crown. That was all she was getting from the - well they called it the Poor's Board then, I don't know what they call it - the Social Security now, I suppose. Half-a-crown a week he used to get for her - his granny.

Interviewer: How much did your husband get in 1920s as wage?

Well, it couldn't be much more, but he was - when he was - went to - when it was in the wartime, twelve-and-six allowance Ah had.

Twelve-an - that's right, uh-huh.

Twelve-an-six o an allowance.

An that was for you an the children?

Oh, there were no children then.

Oh no. During the war. Uh-huh

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Inverness Memories - buying provisions

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1970s

grocers; cooperative societies; cooperative society; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Inverness Recollections

In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with a Mrs. Sneddon. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers how her husband preferred the local grocer to the Co-op. <br /> <br /> The photograph is of Friars Street with the steeple of the Old High Church in the background.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Was yer husband very interested in politics or anything, or?<br /> <br /> Oh, a great labour man. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Was he?<br /> <br /> Oh aye, labour, labour. An he didna like the Co-op. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did he not?<br /> <br /> No, he didna like the Co-op at all. It's always Mr. Anderson in Academy Street. The railwaymens were great, near all they went the Co-op, ye know? No him, he always backed up Anderson. He'd tell them that's how they were all so miserable, the Co-op ones. [Laughter].<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Course, I mean, there was no Social Security or anything to help you in those days?<br /> <br /> Oh there were nothing. We would get nothing. <br /> <br /> There was only the soupy dinners, wasn't there? But not for us, but for the poor, poor ones. <br /> <br /> Oh, in the olden times, aye. Ah used to hear yer father saying that they would get a bowl of porridge for a penny. An he used to go - he said that there was many a time he was sent to Johnny Macbain's for his granny's half crown. That was all she was getting from the - well they called it the Poor's Board then, I don't know what they call it - the Social Security now, I suppose. Half-a-crown a week he used to get for her - his granny. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: How much did your husband get in 1920s as wage?<br /> <br /> Well, it couldn't be much more, but he was - when he was - went to - when it was in the wartime, twelve-and-six allowance Ah had.<br /> <br /> Twelve-an - that's right, uh-huh.<br /> <br /> Twelve-an-six o an allowance. <br /> <br /> An that was for you an the children?<br /> <br /> Oh, there were no children then. <br /> <br /> Oh no. During the war. Uh-huh