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TITLE
Inverness Memories - shifts on the Highland Railway
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_MRSROLLO_18
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
Mrs Rollo
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2136
KEYWORDS
night shifts
audio

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In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with a Mrs. Sneddon. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers her husband's work shifts.

The photograph is of Friars Street with the steeple of the Old High Church in the background.

When he used to go in the railway, he'd be sent, called out, perhaps a bar boy would come an call, 'Turn out for so and so' an 'Turn out for three-twenty' at night, in the middle o the night, so he would have to get up through the night an make his lunch or whatever, 'chuck' as they used to call it, the railway. Perhaps fry a couple a herring or something if we had nothing cold. That for a meal. There were no, no warning. Just about an hour's warning to get ready for that trains.

Interviewer: An did they just come in, knock on the door?

Aye, knock at the door or give a cock crow.

Interviewer: An then how long would he be away for?

Well his eight hours or if - It all depended on if they were stuck on the road. Like the time they were frozen out. The big freeze. They lost, I don't - hundreds of sheep then in the snow. They were choked. He was missing - he wasn't missing - but he wasn't home for about four or five days then. But the railway managed to get some food to them. But I was just waiting all the time, night an day, just till he'd come, oh.

Interviewer: It must have been worrying. Ye didn't know where he was or -?

Oh, we knew where he was - He was stuck in the hills somewhere.

Interviewer: But, that was all ye knew?

Mm-hmm. So you wouldn't need to be nervous in them days.

Interviewer: No, you wouldn't have. [Laughter]

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Inverness Memories - shifts on the Highland Railway

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1970s

night shifts; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Inverness Recollections

In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with a Mrs. Sneddon. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers her husband's work shifts. <br /> <br /> The photograph is of Friars Street with the steeple of the Old High Church in the background.<br /> <br /> When he used to go in the railway, he'd be sent, called out, perhaps a bar boy would come an call, 'Turn out for so and so' an 'Turn out for three-twenty' at night, in the middle o the night, so he would have to get up through the night an make his lunch or whatever, 'chuck' as they used to call it, the railway. Perhaps fry a couple a herring or something if we had nothing cold. That for a meal. There were no, no warning. Just about an hour's warning to get ready for that trains.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: An did they just come in, knock on the door? <br /> <br /> Aye, knock at the door or give a cock crow.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: An then how long would he be away for?<br /> <br /> Well his eight hours or if - It all depended on if they were stuck on the road. Like the time they were frozen out. The big freeze. They lost, I don't - hundreds of sheep then in the snow. They were choked. He was missing - he wasn't missing - but he wasn't home for about four or five days then. But the railway managed to get some food to them. But I was just waiting all the time, night an day, just till he'd come, oh.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: It must have been worrying. Ye didn't know where he was or -?<br /> <br /> Oh, we knew where he was - He was stuck in the hills somewhere. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: But, that was all ye knew?<br /> <br /> Mm-hmm. So you wouldn't need to be nervous in them days.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: No, you wouldn't have. [Laughter]