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TITLE
Inverness Memories - first cars in Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_MRSROLLO_21
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
Mrs Rollo
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2141
KEYWORDS
vehicles
buses
public transport
audio

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In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with Bill Sinclair. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers the first cars in Inverness.

The photograph is of Mrs Rosie Rollo, her husband John (in his army uniform), and one of the couple's children. It was taken around 1918.

Interviewer: Do you remember when motor cars came to Inverness first?

Oh, the first motor car -

Interviewer: Remember seeing the first one?

Yes, it was Dr. Kerr that had it, an he had the garage up in the top o the street.

Interviewer: Which garage was that?

Up at the top o the street, there, he used to park his car. Where number three is - the 'Highland Herald' -

Interviewer: Oh yes.

- is now.

Interviewer: Just at the top of Friars Street, yes?

Yes, the top of Friars Street. An Mr. Campbell, was chauffeur. An there were another - What was the other one's name? He stayed in Friars Lane, the other chauffeur. Uh-huh. An he used to wear - In the winter time, he used a pony, or a horse, an sleighs, when he couldn't get the car going in the, in the snow.

Interviewer: I remember - Wasn't there Greig's, was it Greig's the first public bus service in town?

Yes, yes, Greig's. Yes.

Interviewer: I do myself remember the first double decker bus in town - used to go from, from opposite the La Scala to the Kessock Ferry.

Kessock Ferry, yes.

Interviewer: And if I can recollect it was brown in colour, with 'Greig's' written on it?

Brown, yes. 'Greig's' right across it, yes, aye.

Interviewer: That's right. Do you remember anything where the bus, where the bus routes were in these days, in town? Where could you get a bus to when they started? Can you remember anything about the first routes? Obviously Kessock Ferry must have been one of the very early routes?

We used to get to Culbokie on Johnny Ross's bus.

Interviewer: It was a privately owned bus?

Privately owned. Uh-huh

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Inverness Memories - first cars in Inverness

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1970s

vehicles; buses; public transport; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Inverness Recollections

In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with Bill Sinclair. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers the first cars in Inverness. <br /> <br /> The photograph is of Mrs Rosie Rollo, her husband John (in his army uniform), and one of the couple's children. It was taken around 1918.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Do you remember when motor cars came to Inverness first? <br /> <br /> Oh, the first motor car - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Remember seeing the first one?<br /> <br /> Yes, it was Dr. Kerr that had it, an he had the garage up in the top o the street.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Which garage was that?<br /> <br /> Up at the top o the street, there, he used to park his car. Where number three is - the 'Highland Herald' - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Oh yes.<br /> <br /> - is now. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Just at the top of Friars Street, yes?<br /> <br /> Yes, the top of Friars Street. An Mr. Campbell, was chauffeur. An there were another - What was the other one's name? He stayed in Friars Lane, the other chauffeur. Uh-huh. An he used to wear - In the winter time, he used a pony, or a horse, an sleighs, when he couldn't get the car going in the, in the snow.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I remember - Wasn't there Greig's, was it Greig's the first public bus service in town?<br /> <br /> Yes, yes, Greig's. Yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I do myself remember the first double decker bus in town - used to go from, from opposite the La Scala to the Kessock Ferry. <br /> <br /> Kessock Ferry, yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And if I can recollect it was brown in colour, with 'Greig's' written on it?<br /> <br /> Brown, yes. 'Greig's' right across it, yes, aye. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: That's right. Do you remember anything where the bus, where the bus routes were in these days, in town? Where could you get a bus to when they started? Can you remember anything about the first routes? Obviously Kessock Ferry must have been one of the very early routes?<br /> <br /> We used to get to Culbokie on Johnny Ross's bus.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: It was a privately owned bus?<br /> <br /> Privately owned. Uh-huh