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TITLE
Inverness Memories - Kessock Herring
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_MRSROLLO_22
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
Mrs Rollo
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2142
KEYWORDS
fishman
milkman
fishwives
audio

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In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with Bill Sinclair. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers buying fish and milk.

The photograph is of Friars Street with the steeple of the Old High Church in the background.

Interviewer: You, you were speaking earlier on about the fishing, fish ladies came round with the fish in the baskets

Oh aye, yes.

Interviewer: Was there any ever in Clachnaharry - any resident ladies in Clachnaharry?

Oh, it was men that came. Came over in boats an they put the boats in the harbour.

Interviewer: At? At the harbour here, yes?

The harbour down there. An then they would - some would come an out with an ordinary wheelbarrow an baskets on it. But the one that we used to, for most get it from, he'd a hurlie, an he would have boxes of whiting an boxes of cod, an haddie.

Interviewer: Yes.

It was all fresh fish - their own off the boats that he had.

Interviewer: Was there a lot of Kessock herring in these days, was there - ?

Oh, Kessock herring, twen-, twenty a penny or something we used to get. But then the milkman, we used to get the milk. They used to come wi a hur-, a horse an cart. An they'd fresh milk, an yer cold milk, an ye would get yer flagon filled for tuppence. An I used to make rice wi them. But then the fresh milk, we used - had for their porridge, or their tea or to drink. An that was only about tuppence or thruppence a pint

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Inverness Memories - Kessock Herring

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1970s

fishman; milkman; fishwives; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Inverness Recollections

In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with Bill Sinclair. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers buying fish and milk. <br /> <br /> The photograph is of Friars Street with the steeple of the Old High Church in the background.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: You, you were speaking earlier on about the fishing, fish ladies came round with the fish in the baskets<br /> <br /> Oh aye, yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Was there any ever in Clachnaharry - any resident ladies in Clachnaharry?<br /> <br /> Oh, it was men that came. Came over in boats an they put the boats in the harbour.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: At? At the harbour here, yes?<br /> <br /> The harbour down there. An then they would - some would come an out with an ordinary wheelbarrow an baskets on it. But the one that we used to, for most get it from, he'd a hurlie, an he would have boxes of whiting an boxes of cod, an haddie.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> It was all fresh fish - their own off the boats that he had.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Was there a lot of Kessock herring in these days, was there - ?<br /> <br /> Oh, Kessock herring, twen-, twenty a penny or something we used to get. But then the milkman, we used to get the milk. They used to come wi a hur-, a horse an cart. An they'd fresh milk, an yer cold milk, an ye would get yer flagon filled for tuppence. An I used to make rice wi them. But then the fresh milk, we used - had for their porridge, or their tea or to drink. An that was only about tuppence or thruppence a pint