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TITLE
Inverness Memories - house in Friars Street
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_MRSROLLO_24
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
Mrs Rollo
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2145
KEYWORDS
utilities
sinks, grates
audio

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In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with Bill Sinclair. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo shows Bill round her house in Friars Street.

The photograph is of Friars Street with the steeple of the Old High Church in the background.

Interviewer: Do you remember anything about running - Did you have running water in the house in these days or was it - Did you have a - ?

Oh yes, running water. Just the - That's the sink that - when we came in.

Interviewer: This is the original sink we're looking at now.

Yes. An the one upstair was the same.

Interviewer: An this is the original range?

That's the original grate, yes.

Interviewer: The original grate too.

An everything that's in the house is, of course it's a bitty cleaner, before we came in.

Interviewer: The grate is in wonderful order; it's polished very, very well, and the brass gleaming, and it's got that real look that it should be here and nowhere else. It just makes the - makes your whole home.

Uh-huh. An then the walls; it was all aboot six or seven layers o paper. An that was a job scrapin it all off till we got it, cause I believe this old houses needs air.

Interviewer: Yes.

An ye see I done all that painting masel on the walls.

Interviewer: Wonderful. It's all finished off in a nice cream with a, with a lighter cream ceiling - plain with light green walls, all paintwork

Of course, it's old fashioned. One thing - nobody can copy my designs. [Laughter]

Interviewer: And your little, you little dresser there, which is very nice. What's the history of it? Did you pick - ?

That's over a hundred years.

Interviewer: Yes, it certainly looks it. Where did you pick that up?

Well, it belonged to Mrs. Fraser of Craighead. They were business people. I think they were slaters or something. They stayed over the water somewhere.

Interviewer: Oh yes.

Well, that belonged to that family. An I got the four kitchen chairs an the screen - Mr. Thingmy got the other day - for the - that used to dry the clothes on, the towel rail.

Interviewer: Yes, very good. Is there anything else in the room that's of interest, worth telling about? Anything - your clock?

Oh, the clock, the clock.

Interviewer: Yes, that looks a very nice one.

That was his grandfather's clock. His father's clock.

Interviewer: What is the history of it?

Well, as far as I know he got it from Grays. Ah think that's what he used to say, anyway

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Inverness Memories - house in Friars Street

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1970s

utilities; sinks, grates; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Inverness Recollections

In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with Bill Sinclair. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo shows Bill round her house in Friars Street. <br /> <br /> The photograph is of Friars Street with the steeple of the Old High Church in the background.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Do you remember anything about running - Did you have running water in the house in these days or was it - Did you have a - ?<br /> <br /> Oh yes, running water. Just the - That's the sink that - when we came in. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: This is the original sink we're looking at now.<br /> <br /> Yes. An the one upstair was the same. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: An this is the original range?<br /> <br /> That's the original grate, yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: The original grate too.<br /> <br /> An everything that's in the house is, of course it's a bitty cleaner, before we came in.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: The grate is in wonderful order; it's polished very, very well, and the brass gleaming, and it's got that real look that it should be here and nowhere else. It just makes the - makes your whole home.<br /> <br /> Uh-huh. An then the walls; it was all aboot six or seven layers o paper. An that was a job scrapin it all off till we got it, cause I believe this old houses needs air.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> An ye see I done all that painting masel on the walls.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Wonderful. It's all finished off in a nice cream with a, with a lighter cream ceiling - plain with light green walls, all paintwork<br /> <br /> Of course, it's old fashioned. One thing - nobody can copy my designs. [Laughter]<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And your little, you little dresser there, which is very nice. What's the history of it? Did you pick - ?<br /> <br /> That's over a hundred years. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes, it certainly looks it. Where did you pick that up?<br /> <br /> Well, it belonged to Mrs. Fraser of Craighead. They were business people. I think they were slaters or something. They stayed over the water somewhere.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Oh yes.<br /> <br /> Well, that belonged to that family. An I got the four kitchen chairs an the screen - Mr. Thingmy got the other day - for the - that used to dry the clothes on, the towel rail. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes, very good. Is there anything else in the room that's of interest, worth telling about? Anything - your clock?<br /> <br /> Oh, the clock, the clock. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes, that looks a very nice one.<br /> <br /> That was his grandfather's clock. His father's clock. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: What is the history of it?<br /> <br /> Well, as far as I know he got it from Grays. Ah think that's what he used to say, anyway