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TITLE
Inverness Memories - residents of Friars Street
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_MRSROLLO_25
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
Mrs Rollo
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2146
KEYWORDS
Greyfriars churchyard
Geryfriars
thatch
thatching
churches
audio

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In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with Bill Sinclair. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers some of the former residents of Friars Street.

The photograph is of Friars Street with the steeple of the Old High Church in the background.

Interviewer: Do you know anything about - ? Can you tell us anything about the churchyard that we cannot see now, outside your window? You must have been looking out at it for years.

Oh, it was, eh - it wasn't there, it was all houses when we came here.

Interviewer: But, there must have been the old churchyard, just across?

Yes, up at Grey Friars?

Interviewer: Grey Friars churchyard.

Aye, but that's up at number five.

Interviewer: Yes.

It's more their lookout on it.

Interviewer: Yes.

But we only see - But number ten - Mattie Fraser stayed in that an her mother before her. But round the back, the women had a - hens an Ah think she had a cow - they used to sell milk an all, cause she could see the cobbles, on the stall.

Interviewer: And this, you can still see this?

Oh I don't know now. That's it now. Friar Street Castle, they call that. But when Mattie was staying it was a thatched house when we came here; thatch that was on it. But she got it -

Corrugated iron.

- corrugated iron. An she used to say she'd the quietest neighbours in Inverness. But she'd say, 'I never told them I was next to a graveyard.'

Interviewer: There must have been quite a lot of thatched houses round this area, was there, when you came here?

No, it was the only thatched house but there were ones in, in Douglas Row. The boy Murrays, where they stayed in, at the foot o the cemetery, the Old High Church.

Interviewer: Was, was there anybody in Inverness then, that did thatching?

Not as far as I know.

Interviewer: No.

No, because that's why she had to get corrugated iron on her -

Interviewer: Well this happened, of course, all over the Highlands.

Yes. Uh-huh

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Inverness Memories - residents of Friars Street

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1970s

Greyfriars churchyard; Geryfriars; thatch; thatching; churches; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Inverness Recollections

In the late 1970s, Mrs Rollo, an elderly resident of Friars Street, Inverness, shared her memories of old Inverness with Bill Sinclair. Mrs. Rollo had lived as a child in Shore Street and moved to Friars Street in the early 1920s. She had five of a family; three boys and two girls. Her husband worked for the Highland Railway. In this audio extract, Mrs. Rollo remembers some of the former residents of Friars Street. <br /> <br /> The photograph is of Friars Street with the steeple of the Old High Church in the background.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Do you know anything about - ? Can you tell us anything about the churchyard that we cannot see now, outside your window? You must have been looking out at it for years.<br /> <br /> Oh, it was, eh - it wasn't there, it was all houses when we came here. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: But, there must have been the old churchyard, just across?<br /> <br /> Yes, up at Grey Friars?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Grey Friars churchyard.<br /> <br /> Aye, but that's up at number five. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> It's more their lookout on it.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> But we only see - But number ten - Mattie Fraser stayed in that an her mother before her. But round the back, the women had a - hens an Ah think she had a cow - they used to sell milk an all, cause she could see the cobbles, on the stall.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And this, you can still see this?<br /> <br /> Oh I don't know now. That's it now. Friar Street Castle, they call that. But when Mattie was staying it was a thatched house when we came here; thatch that was on it. But she got it -<br /> <br /> Corrugated iron.<br /> <br /> - corrugated iron. An she used to say she'd the quietest neighbours in Inverness. But she'd say, 'I never told them I was next to a graveyard.'<br /> <br /> Interviewer: There must have been quite a lot of thatched houses round this area, was there, when you came here?<br /> <br /> No, it was the only thatched house but there were ones in, in Douglas Row. The boy Murrays, where they stayed in, at the foot o the cemetery, the Old High Church.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Was, was there anybody in Inverness then, that did thatching? <br /> <br /> Not as far as I know.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: No.<br /> <br /> No, because that's why she had to get corrugated iron on her -<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Well this happened, of course, all over the Highlands.<br /> <br /> Yes. Uh-huh