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TITLE
Dunlin in the Outer Hebrides
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_PETERCUNNINGHAM_06
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Peter Cunningham
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2157
KEYWORDS
ornithology
Outer Hebrides
audio

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In this audio extract, Hebridean ornithologist Peter Cunningham talks about dunlin in the Outer Hebrides.

Interviewer: Last week in Harris I saw, near Luskintyre, a flock of about, oh, a dozen dunlin. Could this be a non-breeding flock again? Perhaps something like the - what we're seeing here just now?

Well, I would have expected that down on the foreshore of a sandy place like that where they feed on the shoreline but up on a freshwater loch like this you would normally just expect to find breeding pairs, and off-duty birds.

Interviewer: Now, can you tell me a little bit more about dunlin, Peter? What they look like, and colouration and anything like that?

It's a dumpy little bird - shore birds - with longish legs and a medium-sized beak, with brown above and white below and distinguished in the summer time, as we are seeing them just now, by a conspicuous black patch on their belly. This is the breeding plumage which they only assume at this time of year. In the winter time when we get most of our dunlin here, passage birds from and to the Arctic, they are in winter plumage and much more, much less distinguished looking. They breed all over the Hebrides and on the moorland but are most commonly seen on the foreshore, feeding on the tide line.

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Dunlin in the Outer Hebrides

1980s; 1990s

ornithology; Outer Hebrides; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Bird Watching

In this audio extract, Hebridean ornithologist Peter Cunningham talks about dunlin in the Outer Hebrides.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Last week in Harris I saw, near Luskintyre, a flock of about, oh, a dozen dunlin. Could this be a non-breeding flock again? Perhaps something like the - what we're seeing here just now?<br /> <br /> Well, I would have expected that down on the foreshore of a sandy place like that where they feed on the shoreline but up on a freshwater loch like this you would normally just expect to find breeding pairs, and off-duty birds.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now, can you tell me a little bit more about dunlin, Peter? What they look like, and colouration and anything like that?<br /> <br /> It's a dumpy little bird - shore birds - with longish legs and a medium-sized beak, with brown above and white below and distinguished in the summer time, as we are seeing them just now, by a conspicuous black patch on their belly. This is the breeding plumage which they only assume at this time of year. In the winter time when we get most of our dunlin here, passage birds from and to the Arctic, they are in winter plumage and much more, much less distinguished looking. They breed all over the Hebrides and on the moorland but are most commonly seen on the foreshore, feeding on the tide line.