Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Bird species at Broad Bay, Lewis
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_PETERCUNNINGHAM_09
PLACENAME
Stornoway
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Stornoway
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Peter Cunningham
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2161
KEYWORDS
ornithology
bird watching
audio

Get Adobe Flash player

In this audio extract, Hebridean ornithologist, Peter Cunningham, talks to Bill Sinclair about the different species of birds to be seen at Broad Bay, near Stornoway.

Interviewer: I mentioned a fourth member of the diver family - the white billed diver. Do you ever get these very rare species over in Lewis?

I think we've only had one, or two, species during my experience. I thought I saw one once but it was - it's such a rare bird that I would hesitate to press it as a genuine occurrence. But two - one was seen off the islands south of Barra some years ago by competent ornithologists and that's one of the few records for the Outer Hebrides.

Interviewer: Well, this looks a wonderful place here; the sand in the immediate foreground here and then you've got these rocks - these seaweed-covered rocks - stretching into the - into a sort of estuary really, isn't it?

Well, it's a huge shallow bay which is very prolific fish-wise and seems a very popular area for feeding birds. We get rafts of scoter and eider in the winter time and the beaches are very - this beach in particular - is very good for most wade-, most species of waders in winter time.

Interviewer: Now, what, what is that on the, on the rock there? I see something just moving.

Yes, I can see the white patch. That's a black guillemot. Oh no, sorry, it's an oyster catcher. It had its head down. An oystercatcher - we're seeing the white, the white on the plumage. They're quite common. In fact, now, looking through the binoculars, I can see six of them. The others are rather, rather well hidden. But that's a common species here and beyond you can see - there are two, yes, the herring gulls.

Now, earlier on we saw some oystercatchers in a field and there was some of this year's young -

That's right.

- amongst them and it was quite interesting to see the colouration of the young. It's -

That's right. The leg colour and the more white in the plumage. I wouldn't say they were this year's young -

Were they not?

- they're still immature from last year.

Immature from last year? Ah!

Yes. I would say, or ones that haven't shifted into summer plumage. But we get - it's very difficult to tell our own birds from, from birds from elsewhere because there are large movements of waders - oyster catchers and other waders - through the islands and we can't distinguish between our own birds and the visitors

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Bird species at Broad Bay, Lewis

ROSS: Stornoway

1980s; 1990s

ornithology; bird watching; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Bird Watching

In this audio extract, Hebridean ornithologist, Peter Cunningham, talks to Bill Sinclair about the different species of birds to be seen at Broad Bay, near Stornoway.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I mentioned a fourth member of the diver family - the white billed diver. Do you ever get these very rare species over in Lewis?<br /> <br /> I think we've only had one, or two, species during my experience. I thought I saw one once but it was - it's such a rare bird that I would hesitate to press it as a genuine occurrence. But two - one was seen off the islands south of Barra some years ago by competent ornithologists and that's one of the few records for the Outer Hebrides.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Well, this looks a wonderful place here; the sand in the immediate foreground here and then you've got these rocks - these seaweed-covered rocks - stretching into the - into a sort of estuary really, isn't it?<br /> <br /> Well, it's a huge shallow bay which is very prolific fish-wise and seems a very popular area for feeding birds. We get rafts of scoter and eider in the winter time and the beaches are very - this beach in particular - is very good for most wade-, most species of waders in winter time.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now, what, what is that on the, on the rock there? I see something just moving.<br /> <br /> Yes, I can see the white patch. That's a black guillemot. Oh no, sorry, it's an oyster catcher. It had its head down. An oystercatcher - we're seeing the white, the white on the plumage. They're quite common. In fact, now, looking through the binoculars, I can see six of them. The others are rather, rather well hidden. But that's a common species here and beyond you can see - there are two, yes, the herring gulls.<br /> <br /> Now, earlier on we saw some oystercatchers in a field and there was some of this year's young - <br /> <br /> That's right.<br /> <br /> - amongst them and it was quite interesting to see the colouration of the young. It's - <br /> <br /> That's right. The leg colour and the more white in the plumage. I wouldn't say they were this year's young - <br /> <br /> Were they not? <br /> <br /> - they're still immature from last year.<br /> <br /> Immature from last year? Ah!<br /> <br /> Yes. I would say, or ones that haven't shifted into summer plumage. But we get - it's very difficult to tell our own birds from, from birds from elsewhere because there are large movements of waders - oyster catchers and other waders - through the islands and we can't distinguish between our own birds and the visitors