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TITLE
St Columba's Font Stone
EXTERNAL ID
PC_ABRIACHAN_NURSERIES_01
PLACENAME
Abriachan
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF IMAGE
4 November 2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Cat Davidson
SOURCE
Abriachan Nurseries
ASSET ID
21662
KEYWORDS
myths
legends
St Columba's Font Stone

In the grounds of Abriachan Nursery, under the branches of some hazel trees, is a mysterious man-made hole sunk into granite schist. No-one knows for sure why it's there or what it is for. The most common explanation attributes it to St. Columba, who passed there in the 6th century. Some people believe it is the base for a cross while others think the water it contains was used to anoint and purify. There is a belief that the water is of benefit to women in childbirth a few drops have been known to be added to baptismal bowls of infants. Interestingly, the hole, which isn't attached to any underground spring and is sunk in the most impermeable of stone, has never been known to run dry.

Other, less exciting, explanations state that it is the foundation stone of a house, used to support the central wooden roof pole or a partially constructed millstone.

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St Columba's Font Stone

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

2000s

myths; legends

Abriachan Nurseries

In the grounds of Abriachan Nursery, under the branches of some hazel trees, is a mysterious man-made hole sunk into granite schist. No-one knows for sure why it's there or what it is for. The most common explanation attributes it to St. Columba, who passed there in the 6th century. Some people believe it is the base for a cross while others think the water it contains was used to anoint and purify. There is a belief that the water is of benefit to women in childbirth a few drops have been known to be added to baptismal bowls of infants. Interestingly, the hole, which isn't attached to any underground spring and is sunk in the most impermeable of stone, has never been known to run dry.<br /> <br /> Other, less exciting, explanations state that it is the foundation stone of a house, used to support the central wooden roof pole or a partially constructed millstone.