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TITLE
MusicMemory Store - Myrtle Gillies chooses "Thug mi mo lamh do'n Eileanac
EXTERNAL ID
PC_ACG_MMS_11
PLACENAME
N/A
DATE OF IMAGE
2010
PERIOD
2010s
SOURCE
An Comunn Gàidhealach
ASSET ID
21673
KEYWORDS
music
songs
MusicMemory Store - Myrtle Gillies chooses "Thug mi mo lamh do'n Eileanac

Myrtle Gillies (nee MacPherson) was born and brought up in Stirlingshire of Argyllshire parents. She came to work at Dounreay as a Metallurgist in 1961 and soon met up with her husband-to-be, John Gillies, who worked on site as an administrator. John and Myrtle were married in 1963 and spent almost all of their married life in Strath Halladale. Sadly John died suddenly in 1995 but Myrtle continued to play an active part in community life. She was a founder member of Melvich Gaelic Choir which was formed in 1975, and served as the Choir conductor for 20 years. She was also an active member of Melvich Community Council serving both as Secretary and Chairman. She is still Chairman of the Halladale Hall and Amenities Committee. She is been a member of Caithness Church of Scotland Presbytery for 17 years and has served the Kirk in many capacities during that time. In 2006 Myrtle moved to a new home in Thurso. In 1994, Myrtle was awarded an MBE for services to the Nuclear Industry.

"The song that is very special to me is called "Thug mi mo lamh do'n Eileanach" (I gave my hand to the Islander) written by Hugh Mathieson. It was published in A' Choisir-Chiuil, the repertoir of the Glasgow St. Columba Gaelic Choir, Conductor Archibald Ferguson.
The reason it is special is that, soon after my late husband, John, and I started courting, he asked me to learn this song so that in private moments I could sing it to him. Coming from Skye, he himself was the Islander. I did sing it for him a few times but once we got married, were raising a family, running a croft and pursuing careers, time for singing songs was devoted to Melvich Gaelic Choir and the "Eileanach" was forgotten. Only when I started to think about a song with special significance for me, did I recollect this one. On singing through it again (quite an emotional experience), I decided that it was indeed my special song.

This is one of the contributions to the MusicMemory Store project which is being run as part of the build-up to the National Mòd 2010 in Caithness. A variety of local people have been asked to select a favourite traditional or Gaelic music track which has a personal meaning for them, and to share the music and the story with the public.

The project seeks to raise the profile of the value of traditional and Gaelic music within the community and its relationship to the National Mòd 2010 which is being hosted in Caithness for the very first time, from 8 to 16 October.

Copies of the albums containing their chosen track are available to borrow from Wick and Thurso libraries. A new contribution will be published each week from May until the start of the Mòd.

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MusicMemory Store - Myrtle Gillies chooses "Thug mi mo lamh do'n Eileanac

2010s

music; songs

An Comunn Gàidhealach

MusicMemory Store

Myrtle Gillies (nee MacPherson) was born and brought up in Stirlingshire of Argyllshire parents. She came to work at Dounreay as a Metallurgist in 1961 and soon met up with her husband-to-be, John Gillies, who worked on site as an administrator. John and Myrtle were married in 1963 and spent almost all of their married life in Strath Halladale. Sadly John died suddenly in 1995 but Myrtle continued to play an active part in community life. She was a founder member of Melvich Gaelic Choir which was formed in 1975, and served as the Choir conductor for 20 years. She was also an active member of Melvich Community Council serving both as Secretary and Chairman. She is still Chairman of the Halladale Hall and Amenities Committee. She is been a member of Caithness Church of Scotland Presbytery for 17 years and has served the Kirk in many capacities during that time. In 2006 Myrtle moved to a new home in Thurso. In 1994, Myrtle was awarded an MBE for services to the Nuclear Industry.<br /> <br /> "The song that is very special to me is called "Thug mi mo lamh do'n Eileanach" (I gave my hand to the Islander) written by Hugh Mathieson. It was published in A' Choisir-Chiuil, the repertoir of the Glasgow St. Columba Gaelic Choir, Conductor Archibald Ferguson.<br /> The reason it is special is that, soon after my late husband, John, and I started courting, he asked me to learn this song so that in private moments I could sing it to him. Coming from Skye, he himself was the Islander. I did sing it for him a few times but once we got married, were raising a family, running a croft and pursuing careers, time for singing songs was devoted to Melvich Gaelic Choir and the "Eileanach" was forgotten. Only when I started to think about a song with special significance for me, did I recollect this one. On singing through it again (quite an emotional experience), I decided that it was indeed my special song.<br /> <br /> This is one of the contributions to the MusicMemory Store project which is being run as part of the build-up to the National Mòd 2010 in Caithness. A variety of local people have been asked to select a favourite traditional or Gaelic music track which has a personal meaning for them, and to share the music and the story with the public.<br /> <br /> The project seeks to raise the profile of the value of traditional and Gaelic music within the community and its relationship to the National Mòd 2010 which is being hosted in Caithness for the very first time, from 8 to 16 October. <br /> <br /> Copies of the albums containing their chosen track are available to borrow from Wick and Thurso libraries. A new contribution will be published each week from May until the start of the Mòd.