Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
MusicMemory Store - Danny O' Hagan
EXTERNAL ID
PC_ACG_MMS_12
DATE OF IMAGE
2010
PERIOD
2010s
SOURCE
An Comunn Gàidhealach
ASSET ID
21674
KEYWORDS
music
songs
MusicMemory Store - Danny O' Hagan

Born in Glasgow, where he studied for the priesthood for seven years before studying philosophy in Dublin. Danny then followed in the footsteps of Matt McGinn and ran the Adventure PlayGround in the Gorbals for a couple of years. He's been in Caithness since 1973 and been involved with the folk music scene over the years. He plays guitar and sings and is a member of Clapshot, whose first CD will hopefully be released during the Mòd this October - or soon after. Watch for it.

"Very difficult to pick out one song as there have been too many to include in this short piece. Although my brother and I were singers as children and knew lots of music hall songs, the first major impact I can remember musically is hearing Fats Domino singing "Blueberry Hill" when on a camping trip from school, in, I think, 1956. It must have been on one of the first transistor radios and I was blown away by the music. When studying philosophy in Ireland in 1960, at a Christmas concert, one of the boys sang and acted out "The Croppie Boy". Again, although quite familiar with Irish music, until then it had normally been of the music hall variety and it dawned on me then that there was a whole lot of traditional music that I hadn't really been listening to. In 1962, I think, I was walking one evening from the town centre and saw a notice in Montrose St, Glasgow, advertising Josh Macrae, (He of "Messing About on the River" fame) and knowing the song, thought I would investigate. It opened up a whole new world for me. They were singing songs I knew, could join in with and I was learning to play guitar, I felt right at home. Later, it dawned on me that my mother's favourite song "The Dawning of the Day" was actually a folk song and it became part of my repertoire. Paddy Kavanagh's "Raglan Rd" to the same melody has become one of my all-time favourites as a result. I doubt if there is a better version than that by the late Luke Kelly of the Dubliners."

This is one of the contributions to the MusicMemory Store project which is being run as part of the build-up to the National Mòd 2010 in Caithness. A variety of local people have been asked to select a favourite traditional or Gaelic music track which has a personal meaning for them, and to share the music and the story with the public.

The project seeks to raise the profile of the value of traditional and Gaelic music within the community and its relationship to the National Mòd 2010 which is being hosted in Caithness for the very first time, from 8 to 16 October.

Copies of the albums containing their chosen track are available to borrow from Wick and Thurso libraries. A new contribution will be published each week from May until the start of the Mòd.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

MusicMemory Store - Danny O' Hagan

2010s

music; songs

An Comunn Gàidhealach

MusicMemory Store

Born in Glasgow, where he studied for the priesthood for seven years before studying philosophy in Dublin. Danny then followed in the footsteps of Matt McGinn and ran the Adventure PlayGround in the Gorbals for a couple of years. He's been in Caithness since 1973 and been involved with the folk music scene over the years. He plays guitar and sings and is a member of Clapshot, whose first CD will hopefully be released during the Mòd this October - or soon after. Watch for it.<br /> <br /> "Very difficult to pick out one song as there have been too many to include in this short piece. Although my brother and I were singers as children and knew lots of music hall songs, the first major impact I can remember musically is hearing Fats Domino singing "Blueberry Hill" when on a camping trip from school, in, I think, 1956. It must have been on one of the first transistor radios and I was blown away by the music. When studying philosophy in Ireland in 1960, at a Christmas concert, one of the boys sang and acted out "The Croppie Boy". Again, although quite familiar with Irish music, until then it had normally been of the music hall variety and it dawned on me then that there was a whole lot of traditional music that I hadn't really been listening to. In 1962, I think, I was walking one evening from the town centre and saw a notice in Montrose St, Glasgow, advertising Josh Macrae, (He of "Messing About on the River" fame) and knowing the song, thought I would investigate. It opened up a whole new world for me. They were singing songs I knew, could join in with and I was learning to play guitar, I felt right at home. Later, it dawned on me that my mother's favourite song "The Dawning of the Day" was actually a folk song and it became part of my repertoire. Paddy Kavanagh's "Raglan Rd" to the same melody has become one of my all-time favourites as a result. I doubt if there is a better version than that by the late Luke Kelly of the Dubliners."<br /> <br /> This is one of the contributions to the MusicMemory Store project which is being run as part of the build-up to the National Mòd 2010 in Caithness. A variety of local people have been asked to select a favourite traditional or Gaelic music track which has a personal meaning for them, and to share the music and the story with the public.<br /> <br /> The project seeks to raise the profile of the value of traditional and Gaelic music within the community and its relationship to the National Mòd 2010 which is being hosted in Caithness for the very first time, from 8 to 16 October. <br /> <br /> Copies of the albums containing their chosen track are available to borrow from Wick and Thurso libraries. A new contribution will be published each week from May until the start of the Mòd.