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TITLE
MusicMemory Store - Margie Sinclair chooses "The Freedom, Come All Ye"
EXTERNAL ID
PC_ACG_MMS_17
PLACENAME
N/A
DATE OF IMAGE
2010
PERIOD
2010s
SOURCE
An Comunn Gàidhealach
ASSET ID
21679
KEYWORDS
music
songs
MusicMemory Store - Margie Sinclair chooses "The Freedom, Come All Ye"

Margie is a singer with Scottish Traditional folk group MIRK, one of the local bands in the 'folk revival'. Margie also has a great and distinctive singing voice. Her husband Iain Sinclair, also in MIRK, was the strings instructor in the Caithness schools for many years. She lives near Dunnet.

"The song that I have chosen is, "The Freedom, Come All Ye". I first heard this song in 1970 at the Thurso Folk Festival. To this day I can recall the effect the singer and the song had on me. The atmosphere in the room was electrifying. It was one of those magical moments rarely experienced, which makes the hairs on the back of your neck stand up and you realize that you are experiencing that very special chemistry of the right singer, the right song and the right occasion. Arthur Johnstone from Glasgow sang with a folk group called, The Laggan, but is principally known as one of Scotland's foremost unaccompanied singers of traditional songs. He has a powerful voice and personality and delivers a song with great passion. The highly regarded academic, Hamish Henderson, who was a vast repository of knowledge of Scotland's history and culture, wrote this song. Tireless in his efforts to preserve and promote the rich diversity of this legacy for future generations, Hamish gave generously of his time, encouragement and expertise to all who sought it. This song's timeless message is especially relevant in today's world, encompassing as it does, a truly international imperative for tolerance and the brotherhood of man.

It was written in broad Scots embracing the rich vocabulary and cadences of language which are a joy to sing. Hamish Henderson died in 2002 and Arthur Johnstone was asked by Canon Kenyon Wright to perform 'Freedom, Come All Ye" at the funeral service in St Mary's Cathedral in Edinburgh. Arthur was also asked to sing the song for Nelson Mandela at his welcome to Glasgow. Hamish Henderson was a giant of a man in every sense, a national treasure and I am proud to have called him friend."

This is one of the contributions to the MusicMemory Store project which is being run as part of the build-up to the National Mòd 2010 in Caithness. A variety of local people have been asked to select a favourite traditional or Gaelic music track which has a personal meaning for them, and to share the music and the story with the public.

The project seeks to raise the profile of the value of traditional and Gaelic music within the community and its relationship to the National Mòd 2010 which is being hosted in Caithness for the very first time, from 8 to 16 October.

Copies of the albums containing their chosen track are available to borrow from Wick and Thurso libraries. A new contribution will be published each week from May until the start of the Mòd.

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MusicMemory Store - Margie Sinclair chooses "The Freedom, Come All Ye"

2010s

music; songs

An Comunn Gàidhealach

MusicMemory Store

Margie is a singer with Scottish Traditional folk group MIRK, one of the local bands in the 'folk revival'. Margie also has a great and distinctive singing voice. Her husband Iain Sinclair, also in MIRK, was the strings instructor in the Caithness schools for many years. She lives near Dunnet.<br /> <br /> "The song that I have chosen is, "The Freedom, Come All Ye". I first heard this song in 1970 at the Thurso Folk Festival. To this day I can recall the effect the singer and the song had on me. The atmosphere in the room was electrifying. It was one of those magical moments rarely experienced, which makes the hairs on the back of your neck stand up and you realize that you are experiencing that very special chemistry of the right singer, the right song and the right occasion. Arthur Johnstone from Glasgow sang with a folk group called, The Laggan, but is principally known as one of Scotland's foremost unaccompanied singers of traditional songs. He has a powerful voice and personality and delivers a song with great passion. The highly regarded academic, Hamish Henderson, who was a vast repository of knowledge of Scotland's history and culture, wrote this song. Tireless in his efforts to preserve and promote the rich diversity of this legacy for future generations, Hamish gave generously of his time, encouragement and expertise to all who sought it. This song's timeless message is especially relevant in today's world, encompassing as it does, a truly international imperative for tolerance and the brotherhood of man. <br /> <br /> It was written in broad Scots embracing the rich vocabulary and cadences of language which are a joy to sing. Hamish Henderson died in 2002 and Arthur Johnstone was asked by Canon Kenyon Wright to perform 'Freedom, Come All Ye" at the funeral service in St Mary's Cathedral in Edinburgh. Arthur was also asked to sing the song for Nelson Mandela at his welcome to Glasgow. Hamish Henderson was a giant of a man in every sense, a national treasure and I am proud to have called him friend."<br /> <br /> This is one of the contributions to the MusicMemory Store project which is being run as part of the build-up to the National Mòd 2010 in Caithness. A variety of local people have been asked to select a favourite traditional or Gaelic music track which has a personal meaning for them, and to share the music and the story with the public.<br /> <br /> The project seeks to raise the profile of the value of traditional and Gaelic music within the community and its relationship to the National Mòd 2010 which is being hosted in Caithness for the very first time, from 8 to 16 October. <br /> <br /> Copies of the albums containing their chosen track are available to borrow from Wick and Thurso libraries. A new contribution will be published each week from May until the start of the Mòd.