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TITLE
Red deer and greylag geese, Central Highlands
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_REDDEERANDGREYLAGGEESE
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2170
KEYWORDS
rutting
migration
ornithology
bird watching
audio

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Most red deer in Britain can be found on the open moorlands of the Scottish Highlands and Islands. Although extinct in the Lowlands by the end of the 18th century, Highland numbers were increased with the subsequent development of the sport of deer stalking. The majority of the deer population live in open-hill habitats all year round although they tend to be smaller than those resident in woodland areas. For much of the year, male and female groups remain separate, feeding on grasses, rushes, and sedges in summer, and heather and blaeberry in winter.

Mating takes place from the end of September to November. Mature stags defend groups of hinds to prevent mating by competitors. During the 'rut', stags engage in roaring contests. This may escalate into physical locking of antlers and physical injury is not uncommon.

In this short audio extract, recorded one frosty night in the Central Highlands in early October, red deer can be heard roaring during the mating season. A migrating flock of greylag geese can also be heard honking in the background

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Red deer and greylag geese, Central Highlands

1980s; 1990s

rutting; migration; ornithology; bird watching; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Bird Watching

Most red deer in Britain can be found on the open moorlands of the Scottish Highlands and Islands. Although extinct in the Lowlands by the end of the 18th century, Highland numbers were increased with the subsequent development of the sport of deer stalking. The majority of the deer population live in open-hill habitats all year round although they tend to be smaller than those resident in woodland areas. For much of the year, male and female groups remain separate, feeding on grasses, rushes, and sedges in summer, and heather and blaeberry in winter. <br /> <br /> Mating takes place from the end of September to November. Mature stags defend groups of hinds to prevent mating by competitors. During the 'rut', stags engage in roaring contests. This may escalate into physical locking of antlers and physical injury is not uncommon. <br /> <br /> In this short audio extract, recorded one frosty night in the Central Highlands in early October, red deer can be heard roaring during the mating season. A migrating flock of greylag geese can also be heard honking in the background