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TITLE
Old bridge, Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_REVHENDERSON_02
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Reverend Derek Henderson
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2174
KEYWORDS
slide shows
photographer
photographers
audio

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Joseph Cook was a popular Inverness speaker who collected photographs on many subjects to illustrate his talks. In this audio extract, taken from a recorded slide show, the Reverend Derek Henderson of Inverness discusses one of Mr. Cook's images.

'This is a print of course, not photograph, of the old Inverness stone bridge; it was built a long time ago; it was built in 1685. It was built by public subscription. It didn't cost very much; it cost one thousand, three hundred pounds. Much of that was given as a donation by Macleod of Macleod. The bridge was demolished in 1849, when there was a great flood caused, very largely, by the fact that the canal burst its banks and added to the torrent. Now, in between the second and third arches, there was a prison; it measured twelve feet by nine feet by six feet, and the only way into it was through a grating from the pathway. And then there was a rope with a pitcher which the prisoner used to bring water up for himself. Now it was a pretty dreadful place and the record has it that a man died from rat bites in that particular place. Further towards the end of the bridge there were two coats of arms; one was the town coat of arms and the other one, in lieu of his generosity, was Macleod of Macleod's. When the bridge collapsed, I may say with no casualties fortunately, the coats of arms fell into the river and the only one that was recovered - the other one was possibly smashed - was the town coat of arms. And if you're walking down Castle Wynd tonight, on the gable end of the town hall you'll see the coat of arms that fell off this bridge in 1849; it's now bedded in the gable end of the town hall'

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Old bridge, Inverness

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1980s

slide shows; photographer; photographers; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Rev. Henderson on Joseph Cook

Joseph Cook was a popular Inverness speaker who collected photographs on many subjects to illustrate his talks. In this audio extract, taken from a recorded slide show, the Reverend Derek Henderson of Inverness discusses one of Mr. Cook's images.<br /> <br /> 'This is a print of course, not photograph, of the old Inverness stone bridge; it was built a long time ago; it was built in 1685. It was built by public subscription. It didn't cost very much; it cost one thousand, three hundred pounds. Much of that was given as a donation by Macleod of Macleod. The bridge was demolished in 1849, when there was a great flood caused, very largely, by the fact that the canal burst its banks and added to the torrent. Now, in between the second and third arches, there was a prison; it measured twelve feet by nine feet by six feet, and the only way into it was through a grating from the pathway. And then there was a rope with a pitcher which the prisoner used to bring water up for himself. Now it was a pretty dreadful place and the record has it that a man died from rat bites in that particular place. Further towards the end of the bridge there were two coats of arms; one was the town coat of arms and the other one, in lieu of his generosity, was Macleod of Macleod's. When the bridge collapsed, I may say with no casualties fortunately, the coats of arms fell into the river and the only one that was recovered - the other one was possibly smashed - was the town coat of arms. And if you're walking down Castle Wynd tonight, on the gable end of the town hall you'll see the coat of arms that fell off this bridge in 1849; it's now bedded in the gable end of the town hall'