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TITLE
Architectural Audit of Inverness: 1-5 Church Street, West Side
EXTERNAL ID
PC_ARCHITECTURALAUDIT_017
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF IMAGE
2001
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Robert Gordon University
SOURCE
Inverness Civic Trust
ASSET ID
21754
KEYWORDS
spires
architecture
toll booth
prisons
prisoners
buildings
plans
streets
streetscapes
Architectural Audit of Inverness: 1-5 Church Street, West Side

This is an elegant 45m high spire built by William Sibbald and Alexander Laing of Edinburgh in 1791. The site of medieval tollbooth from at least 1436, rebuilt 1691 with adjoining courthouse and prison built in 1732. The new courthouse and prison built were between 1787 and 1789. The clock was donated by Sir Hector Munro of Novar. It was damaged by an earthquake in 1816 and restored by Hugh Miller of Cromarty. Eight topmost ornaments were removed in repairs in 1948. The belfry held three bells known locally as the Skellets (Scots for tin pan).

The spire is not shown on this picture, though the swagged-urns mark the point it is based upon. Beneath this there is a belfry which shows influence of Palladian architecture in its Venetian windows. The lower belfry is decorated with Ionian pilasters (pillars which do not support a construction).

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Architectural Audit of Inverness: 1-5 Church Street, West Side

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

2000s

spires; architecture; toll booth; prisons; prisoners; buildings; plans; streets; streetscapes

Inverness Civic Trust

Inverness Civic Trust: Architectural Audit

This is an elegant 45m high spire built by William Sibbald and Alexander Laing of Edinburgh in 1791. The site of medieval tollbooth from at least 1436, rebuilt 1691 with adjoining courthouse and prison built in 1732. The new courthouse and prison built were between 1787 and 1789. The clock was donated by Sir Hector Munro of Novar. It was damaged by an earthquake in 1816 and restored by Hugh Miller of Cromarty. Eight topmost ornaments were removed in repairs in 1948. The belfry held three bells known locally as the Skellets (Scots for tin pan).<br /> <br /> The spire is not shown on this picture, though the swagged-urns mark the point it is based upon. Beneath this there is a belfry which shows influence of Palladian architecture in its Venetian windows. The lower belfry is decorated with Ionian pilasters (pillars which do not support a construction).