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TITLE
Architectural Audit of Inverness: 12-18 High Street, South Side
EXTERNAL ID
PC_ARCHITECTURALAUDIT_037
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF IMAGE
2001
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Robert Gordon University
SOURCE
Inverness Civic Trust
ASSET ID
21774
KEYWORDS
restaurants
eating
Church Street
buildings
plans
streets
streetscapes
Architectural Audit of Inverness: 12-18 High Street, South Side

This is a neo-vernacular block with a glazed oval window and was built in 1989 by J.F. Johnston and Partners. In 1868 John Rhind designed a building with Corinthian columns on this site. The building functioned as the Mackays Clan Tartan warehouse and then the YMCA until it was demolished in 1955. Statues of the Three Graces by the local sculptor Andrew Davidson (1841-1925), locally known as 'Faith, Hope and Charity' were offered by the Town Council to anyone who could take them. An Orcadian acquired them and they remained in Orkney for several decades before returning to Inverness.

At the time of writing the building hosts an electronics store and a fast-food restaurant.

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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Architectural Audit of Inverness: 12-18 High Street, South Side

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

2000s

restaurants; eating; Church Street; buildings; plans; streets; streetscapes

Inverness Civic Trust

Inverness Civic Trust: Architectural Audit

This is a neo-vernacular block with a glazed oval window and was built in 1989 by J.F. Johnston and Partners. In 1868 John Rhind designed a building with Corinthian columns on this site. The building functioned as the Mackays Clan Tartan warehouse and then the YMCA until it was demolished in 1955. Statues of the Three Graces by the local sculptor Andrew Davidson (1841-1925), locally known as 'Faith, Hope and Charity' were offered by the Town Council to anyone who could take them. An Orcadian acquired them and they remained in Orkney for several decades before returning to Inverness.<br /> <br /> At the time of writing the building hosts an electronics store and a fast-food restaurant.